About Safe Search

Safe Search Kids is powered by Google to deliver filtered search results.

Safe Image Search

Safe Search Kids delivers only safe filtered images, powered by Google.

Safe Wiki Search

Safe Search Kids delivers safe wiki articles for kids and teens.

Safe Video Search

Search for safe filtered videos from a variety of trusted sources.

Category: Stuff for Your Brain

Your Life in 2017 – New Year Predictions!

New Years Kids 2017

For many people, a brand new year means a fresh start. For others, there is anticipation about upcoming events, such as another birthday or a special holiday trip. As one year rolls into the next, you may be looking for clues as to what the future holds. Here are 100% genuine true predictions for 2017.

1. You will hear or read something that will hurt your feelings.

Unfortunately, this is a fact of life. Remember that everyone sees the world differently and everyone has a different opinion. And just because you hear or read something that stings you, the commenter might not have meant anything mean.

The key is to not take things too personally.  Expect that people will disappoint you from time to time. Humans make mistakes and often do not intend to hurt others.

2. You will try to reach a goal and fail.

Winning at anything means taking steps along the way and stumbling. Every time you fail at reaching a goal, you get close to actually getting there.

Many famous and successful people have said that there is no success without failure. It is an essential stepping stone to greater things as long as you keep on trying.

3. You will try to reach a goal and succeed.

It might be a small goal, like getting a great mark on a pop quiz or finally being able to make a super-serious friend laugh at one of your jokes.

Every time you try to do something, it makes you stronger and more confident. Most people make lists of huge, towering resolutions and ultimately break them before the year has even started. Make lists of small goals and soon you will find bigger goals easier to tackle.

4. Something you do in 2017 will have a major effect on your life.

It could be a friend that you make. It could be some nice act you perform for another person that changes how you feel about yourself. It could be a new skill you learn or an achievement in school or online.

You might not even know that this “thing” is important until years later. Still, 2017 will make a difference for years to come. Think about that when you get up each morning.

5. One of your idols will do or say something idiotic.

Yup. That’s a guarantee. As a matter of fact, all of us will do or say something idiotic in 2017.

It could be in person or online, but every single living human being will say or do or post something that will look silly to others. That’s why everyone of us should expect to say, “I’m sorry,” or “I’ve made a mistake” at least once in 2017.

6. You will make at least one decision between right and wrong.

Doing the right thing in the face of adversity is never easy. You may be approached to cheat on a test or be tempted to ignore a good friend because of peer pressure.

You may see someone being bullied and want to help them but be faced with fear of what will happen if you do.  Accept that you will make mistakes in 2017 like every other human on the planet.   The important thing is to decide now the kind of person you want to be and surround yourself with the type of people that will help you “be that person”.

7. You will work and you will play – and you can have fun doing both.

A good life is about balance.  All play and no work brings discontentment.  We all need goads to strive for.  All work and no play will stress you out and is not healthy.  Plan now to make sure there is balance in your life… between sports and school, between family and friends and even your own “alone time”.

2017 is going to be an interesting year. The person you are when it begins is not the person you will be when you celebrate 2018.

Enjoy the changes in your life and around the world.

For many people, a brand new year means a fresh start. For others, there is anticipation about upcoming events, such as another birthday or a special holiday trip. As one year rolls into the next, you may be looking for clues as to what the future holds. Here are 100% genuine true predictions for 2017.

1. You will hear or read something that will hurt your feelings.

Unfortunately, this is a fact of life. Remember that everyone sees the world differently and everyone has a different opinion. And just because you hear or read something that stings you, the commenter might not have meant anything mean.

The key is to not take things too personally.  Expect that people will disappoint you from time to time. Humans make mistakes and often do not intend to hurt others.

2. You will try to reach a goal and fail.

Winning at anything means taking steps along the way and stumbling. Every time you fail at reaching a goal, you get close to actually getting there.

Many famous and successful people have said that there is no success without failure. It is an essential stepping stone to greater things as long as you keep on trying.

3. You will try to reach a goal and succeed.

It might be a small goal, like getting a great mark on a pop quiz or finally being able to make a super-serious friend laugh at one of your jokes.

Every time you try to do something, it makes you stronger and more confident. Most people make lists of huge, towering resolutions and ultimately break them before the year has even started. Make lists of small goals and soon you will find bigger goals easier to tackle.

4. Something you do in 2017 will have a major effect on your life.

It could be a friend that you make. It could be some nice act you perform for another person that changes how you feel about yourself. It could be a new skill you learn or an achievement in school or online.

You might not even know that this “thing” is important until years later. Still, 2017 will make a difference for years to come. Think about that when you get up each morning.

5. One of your idols will do or say something idiotic.

Yup. That’s a guarantee. As a matter of fact, all of us will do or say something idiotic in 2017.

It could be in person or online, but every single living human being will say or do or post something that will look silly to others. That’s why everyone of us should expect to say, “I’m sorry,” or “I’ve made a mistake” at least once in 2017.

6. You will make at least one decision between right and wrong.

Doing the right thing in the face of adversity is never easy. You may be approached to cheat on a test or be tempted to ignore a good friend because of peer pressure.

You may see someone being bullied and want to help them but be faced with fear of what will happen if you do.  Accept that you will make mistakes in 2017 like every other human on the planet.   The important thing is to decide now the kind of person you want to be and surround yourself with the type of people that will help you “be that person”.

7. You will work and you will play – and you can have fun doing both.

A good life is about balance.  All play and no work brings discontentment.  We all need goads to strive for.  All work and no play will stress you out and is not healthy.  Plan now to make sure there is balance in your life… between sports and school, between family and friends and even your own “alone time”.

2017 is going to be an interesting year. The person you are when it begins is not the person you will be when you celebrate 2018.

Enjoy the changes in your life and around the world.

And What Did Kim and Justin Give You?

social media celebrities

There’s something fun and kind of cozy—and maybe a little snobbish—about using the same shampoo that Selena Gomez uses. You feel special using the same foundation as Kim Kardashian. You send flowers to your mom, just like Justin Bieber did.

You feel like you are part of an exclusive, personal group of friends who Selena, Justin and Kim confide in, giving you secret insight into their celebrity lives through their tweets and posts.

Well, hold on to your tablet. Kim and Selena and Justin aren’t necessarily sharing personal information with you. They might not even really believe everything they say about those products. Those cozy tweets and posts might be simple cash grabs.

Advertising professionals pick celebrities to tweet or post pictures about the products they are trying to sell. Being paid makes a difference.

When we see commercials on television, we know that the stars who talk about products are paid generously. We take that into account when deciding to buy what they are selling. When your friends tell you about a product, chances are that they are not being paid and really do like or use that brand of jeans or hair gel.

Social media is a new form of communication. People feel close to the people they follow. When a social media “friend” tells you about a new movie they like or a skin cream they use, they could be telling you that because a company is paying them lots and lots of money.

How much money? Kim Kardashian, the undisputed queen of making money on social media, makes up to $20,000 for a tweet about a product. She is paid a reported $300,000 for an Instagram post.

Other celebrities that can demand huge amounts are any Kardashian, Jared Leto, Kendall Jenner, P. Diddy, Gigi Hadid, Lindsay Lohan and most sports figures—including Mike Tyson.

Legally, there is nothing wrong with making money by telling people about your interests and the items you use. What is questionable is how consumers buy products solely because a celebrity endorsing it. Is it the best product and do we even need it?

Do celebrities truly like a product when posting a picture or tweeting about it when they are getting a lot of money to do so?

The reason these big payments should matter to you is because you end up buying Kim Kardashian million-dollar earrings and Mike Tyson’s new car. When companies pay these celebs money, the companies make that money back by charging you more.

You help pay for mansions, fleets of cars, expensive clothes, luxurious trips and outrageous jewelry.

The other thing to think about is this: What did Kim and Justin give you?

There’s something fun and kind of cozy—and maybe a little snobbish—about using the same shampoo that Selena Gomez uses. You feel special using the same foundation as Kim Kardashian. You send flowers to your mom, just like Justin Bieber did.

You feel like you are part of an exclusive, personal group of friends who Selena, Justin and Kim confide in, giving you secret insight into their celebrity lives through their tweets and posts.

Well, hold on to your tablet. Kim and Selena and Justin aren’t necessarily sharing personal information with you. They might not even really believe everything they say about those products. Those cozy tweets and posts might be simple cash grabs.

Advertising professionals pick celebrities to tweet or post pictures about the products they are trying to sell. Being paid makes a difference.

When we see commercials on television, we know that the stars who talk about products are paid generously. We take that into account when deciding to buy what they are selling. When your friends tell you about a product, chances are that they are not being paid and really do like or use that brand of jeans or hair gel.

Social media is a new form of communication. People feel close to the people they follow. When a social media “friend” tells you about a new movie they like or a skin cream they use, they could be telling you that because a company is paying them lots and lots of money.

How much money? Kim Kardashian, the undisputed queen of making money on social media, makes up to $20,000 for a tweet about a product. She is paid a reported $300,000 for an Instagram post.

Other celebrities that can demand huge amounts are any Kardashian, Jared Leto, Kendall Jenner, P. Diddy, Gigi Hadid, Lindsay Lohan and most sports figures—including Mike Tyson.

Legally, there is nothing wrong with making money by telling people about your interests and the items you use. What is questionable is how consumers buy products solely because a celebrity endorsing it. Is it the best product and do we even need it?

Do celebrities truly like a product when posting a picture or tweeting about it when they are getting a lot of money to do so?

The reason these big payments should matter to you is because you end up buying Kim Kardashian million-dollar earrings and Mike Tyson’s new car. When companies pay these celebs money, the companies make that money back by charging you more.

You help pay for mansions, fleets of cars, expensive clothes, luxurious trips and outrageous jewelry.

The other thing to think about is this: What did Kim and Justin give you?

Odd Friends with Search Engines

Life is better when you have odd friends. I discovered this when I introduced my friends Bobby and China. They’re both interesting, fun and incredibly brilliant kids who do Internet searches on absolutely everything. When they met, they pulled out their phones and began looking up ways to top each other.

“So your name is China,” Bobby said with a snort. “That’s a silly name.”

With a haughty sniff, China tipped up her chin and said, “I’ll have you know that according to the dictionary I use, china is a fine, elegant material used in the creation of beautiful artistic creations.”

Bobby jumped around, wriggling from side to side. “Bob means to go up and down like this.”

“And you called ‘China’ silly?” China crossed her arms. “I’ll also have you know that China is a huge country with the most people in the world.”

“Bobby is what British people call their police officers,” Bobby responded. “That’s pretty cool.”

I was about to point out that a bob is also a hair style, but I didn’t want to interrupt the fun as they continued their battle of information.

“Oh, yeah?” China countered. “The traditional British beverage is tea and what do you think your bobby would drink his tea from? A tea cup made out of china! And where do you think tea comes from? China.”

“Not always,” Bobby said. “What about tea from India? Or tea from Argentina? Kenya sells more tea than China.”

“Kenya? Isn’t he some sort of rapper?”

Bobby started laughing so hard, he snorted out of his nose, making China laugh even harder.

Yes, Bobby and China are very different kids. Both Bobby and China go online to see what they can see and learn what they can learn. Both Bobby and China enjoy using the Internet to make their lives and their friendships more interesting. They are odd and that’s what makes them as fun as a roller coaster.

After this exchange, Bobby and China ended up challenging each other to a game of Chinese checkers. I went with them to watch them play, but I couldn’t concentrate.

I was thinking about how challenging each other and doing it with real information and a playful attitude made their friendship stronger while enriching their lives.

Bobby and China showed me how much fun information can be. I saw how respectfully challenging what you think can make everyone better informed while letting everyone have fun.

But as my odd friends play Chinese checkers, I wonder what will happen when I introduce Tatsu to Dracon. Will someone end up breathing fire?

Life is better when you have odd friends. I discovered this when I introduced my friends Bobby and China. They’re both interesting, fun and incredibly brilliant kids who do Internet searches on absolutely everything. When they met, they pulled out their phones and began looking up ways to top each other.

“So your name is China,” Bobby said with a snort. “That’s a silly name.”

With a haughty sniff, China tipped up her chin and said, “I’ll have you know that according to the dictionary I use, china is a fine, elegant material used in the creation of beautiful artistic creations.”

Bobby jumped around, wriggling from side to side. “Bob means to go up and down like this.”

“And you called ‘China’ silly?” China crossed her arms. “I’ll also have you know that China is a huge country with the most people in the world.”

“Bobby is what British people call their police officers,” Bobby responded. “That’s pretty cool.”

I was about to point out that a bob is also a hair style, but I didn’t want to interrupt the fun as they continued their battle of information.

“Oh, yeah?” China countered. “The traditional British beverage is tea and what do you think your bobby would drink his tea from? A tea cup made out of china! And where do you think tea comes from? China.”

“Not always,” Bobby said. “What about tea from India? Or tea from Argentina? Kenya sells more tea than China.”

“Kenya? Isn’t he some sort of rapper?”

Bobby started laughing so hard, he snorted out of his nose, making China laugh even harder.

Yes, Bobby and China are very different kids. Both Bobby and China go online to see what they can see and learn what they can learn. Both Bobby and China enjoy using the Internet to make their lives and their friendships more interesting. They are odd and that’s what makes them as fun as a roller coaster.

After this exchange, Bobby and China ended up challenging each other to a game of Chinese checkers. I went with them to watch them play, but I couldn’t concentrate.

I was thinking about how challenging each other and doing it with real information and a playful attitude made their friendship stronger while enriching their lives.

Bobby and China showed me how much fun information can be. I saw how respectfully challenging what you think can make everyone better informed while letting everyone have fun.

But as my odd friends play Chinese checkers, I wonder what will happen when I introduce Tatsu to Dracon. Will someone end up breathing fire?

Nimble Numbers (Do They Tell the Truth?)

Kids Numbers

Numbers will scream at you all your life. “9 out of 10 dentists recommend Sparkle tooth paste.” “70% of people prefer dogs over cats.” “66.6% of all girls prefer the color purple over the color pink.” Websites and textbooks and advertisers often have numbers for everything. But are those numbers always true?

Those numbers are most commonly found by asking people to answer a question with one or two answers (a poll) or a series of questions with a larger choice of answers (a survey). By asking the right questions, polls and surveys can get answers that don’t quite tell the truth.

Let’s look at advertisers who use dentists to sell a dental product. And imagine that you’ve just invented a brand new tooth paste that tastes like candy floss. You take samples to ten dentists and ask them if they would recommend it to their clients.

The dentists try the tooth paste and, while other tooth pastes they know would be better at dental care, they see nothing wrong with Candy Floss Paste. They know that some kids don’t like brushing their teeth and think that maybe they would be more likely to brush if the paste tasted like candy floss. Nine give you the recommendation.

The tenth thinks, “Well, this won’t hurt anyone, but other brands work better and still taste good.” He doesn’t give you a recommendation.

Still, you can brag that 9 out of 10 dentists recommended your paste. But what if you had given the dentists your paste as well as one of the most effective and yummy-tasting brands and asked which they would recommend? Think about it—then think about whether or not 9 out of 10 is really the truth.

Another way numbers can lie is found in who you ask. Imagine you stand outside a dog show and ask all the people coming in to watch the show: “Do you prefer dogs or cats?” Of course, most of the people will say they prefer dogs. After all, they are going to a dog show. If you want to get a poll that says more people prefer cats, take your poll outside of a cat show.

You might think this is an obvious example, but consider that many polls and surveys take place in your favorite shopping mall. Teenagers in a mall would be more likely to say yes to the question: “Do you plan on buying a new cell phone in the next year?” If you asked that same question in front of a senior citizen’s home, what do you think the results would be?

Now think about how you would get 66.6% of girls to say they preferred purple over pink. Here’s one way: Go to a schoolyard or mall and look for girls wearing purple. Ask them if they prefer purple over pink. If they are wearing purple, chances are very good that they will say that they prefer purple over pink. One, though, might prefer pink but didn’t have an clean pink shirt to wear that day.

Here’s another way. Get a celebrity or a person who resembles a popular singer. Dress that person in an expensive, cool purple shirt or dress. Studies have shown that people will give poll responses that they hope will get the approval of the attractive person asking the question. That answer might not be the truth, but it might help make purple more popular.

Next time you see a commercial or read a news story with a percentage in it, think about that number. More importantly, think about how that number was created. That number might not be as true as it sounds.

Numbers will scream at you all your life. “9 out of 10 dentists recommend Sparkle tooth paste.” “70% of people prefer dogs over cats.” “66.6% of all girls prefer the color purple over the color pink.” Websites and textbooks and advertisers often have numbers for everything. But are those numbers always true?

Those numbers are most commonly found by asking people to answer a question with one or two answers (a poll) or a series of questions with a larger choice of answers (a survey). By asking the right questions, polls and surveys can get answers that don’t quite tell the truth.

Let’s look at advertisers who use dentists to sell a dental product. And imagine that you’ve just invented a brand new tooth paste that tastes like candy floss. You take samples to ten dentists and ask them if they would recommend it to their clients.

The dentists try the tooth paste and, while other tooth pastes they know would be better at dental care, they see nothing wrong with Candy Floss Paste. They know that some kids don’t like brushing their teeth and think that maybe they would be more likely to brush if the paste tasted like candy floss. Nine give you the recommendation.

The tenth thinks, “Well, this won’t hurt anyone, but other brands work better and still taste good.” He doesn’t give you a recommendation.

Still, you can brag that 9 out of 10 dentists recommended your paste. But what if you had given the dentists your paste as well as one of the most effective and yummy-tasting brands and asked which they would recommend? Think about it—then think about whether or not 9 out of 10 is really the truth.

Another way numbers can lie is found in who you ask. Imagine you stand outside a dog show and ask all the people coming in to watch the show: “Do you prefer dogs or cats?” Of course, most of the people will say they prefer dogs. After all, they are going to a dog show. If you want to get a poll that says more people prefer cats, take your poll outside of a cat show.

You might think this is an obvious example, but consider that many polls and surveys take place in your favorite shopping mall. Teenagers in a mall would be more likely to say yes to the question: “Do you plan on buying a new cell phone in the next year?” If you asked that same question in front of a senior citizen’s home, what do you think the results would be?

Now think about how you would get 66.6% of girls to say they preferred purple over pink. Here’s one way: Go to a schoolyard or mall and look for girls wearing purple. Ask them if they prefer purple over pink. If they are wearing purple, chances are very good that they will say that they prefer purple over pink. One, though, might prefer pink but didn’t have an clean pink shirt to wear that day.

Here’s another way. Get a celebrity or a person who resembles a popular singer. Dress that person in an expensive, cool purple shirt or dress. Studies have shown that people will give poll responses that they hope will get the approval of the attractive person asking the question. That answer might not be the truth, but it might help make purple more popular.

Next time you see a commercial or read a news story with a percentage in it, think about that number. More importantly, think about how that number was created. That number might not be as true as it sounds.

Bookmark and Share