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Category: Stuff for Your Brain

Things to Do When Kids Are Bored

It may not feel like it right now, but there is so much fun waiting for you just around the corner.  There are so many things a kid can do when he or she is bored.  You just need a few ideas.  Creativity often works that way. Often, you first need to get the creative juices flowing and soon you’ll be coming up with ideas of your own.

Here are a few brainstorming ideas we came up.  Start by thinking about them.  Then perhaps share them with your friends and see what they thing.

Pick out a couple and ask your parents if you need help to get the fun rolling.   As mentioned, this list may help you think about fun ideas of your own.

Create a Treasure Hunt!

You can go online and read about the different ways that you can arrange the hunt. The best way to get all your friends together and ask a parent to hide the treasure. It could be a batch of cookies or a gift certificate for a pizza or each child could bring one small toy to make up the treasure. Or you could be the treasure master, stashing the prize and making up clues that you hide in advance.

Clues could be something like “Look for the tree with the home-made swing,” or “Find the big grey rock and take three steps south.” Each clue leads to another clue and at the very end, the treasure. Maybe each of your friends could pick a day and hold their own treasure hunt. The hunts can be as long or as short as you want.  This is something you could also do as a family together, outside or in the house.

Have a Box Sculpture Contest!

This is easy.  Just ask your parents to get empty boxes from a grocery or chain store. Make sure you have a lot of them in a lot of different sizes. Then you need strong tape, glue and markers to decorate what you make. You could even decide on a theme, like box spaceships, box forts or box cars.  You can also get creative and spruce up your sculptures with items egg cartons, ribbons and show boxes.

Make Colorful Wall Montage

When was the last time you colored with crayons?  I doubt your parents won’t let you color on your wall, but there are tons of free coloring pages online you can print and color.  Choose from all sorts of drawings and cover one of your bedroom walls with your own colorful creations. It will be like a wall mural but made up of individual pictures.  There are hundred’s of options online of things to color.

Learn How to Fly a Kite!

Kites are relatively cheap to buy, but many kids prefer to learn about kites online and make their own. This activity requires you to follow the weather and look for good places to catch the wind, usually a park or a hill. This takes those reflexes that help you play video games and uses them in the real world. And it’s fun.

Explore Your Local World!

Get a guide book or go online to find out what you can do in your home town! What is the oldest building in your city? Where was the first school built? Was anyone famous born in your town? Is there a museum you can tour? What about a pond where you can sail a boat? Or simply go to your local park and lay in the grass with a friend looking for images in the clouds.

Put on a Kids Clothing Swap!

Ask your parents what they think about this. It would be a good way to clean out closets as well as encourage everyone to recycle. Just make sure that all clothes are clean and mended when they are brought to the swap.

No matter where you live, you can enjoy a whole world of adventure. All you need to do is use your imagination.

It may not feel like it right now, but there is so much fun waiting for you just around the corner.  There are so many things a kid can do when he or she is bored.  You just need a few ideas.  Creativity often works that way. Often, you first need to get the creative juices flowing and soon you’ll be coming up with ideas of your own.

Here are a few brainstorming ideas we came up.  Start by thinking about them.  Then perhaps share them with your friends and see what they thing.

Pick out a couple and ask your parents if you need help to get the fun rolling.   As mentioned, this list may help you think about fun ideas of your own.

Create a Treasure Hunt!

You can go online and read about the different ways that you can arrange the hunt. The best way to get all your friends together and ask a parent to hide the treasure. It could be a batch of cookies or a gift certificate for a pizza or each child could bring one small toy to make up the treasure. Or you could be the treasure master, stashing the prize and making up clues that you hide in advance.

Clues could be something like “Look for the tree with the home-made swing,” or “Find the big grey rock and take three steps south.” Each clue leads to another clue and at the very end, the treasure. Maybe each of your friends could pick a day and hold their own treasure hunt. The hunts can be as long or as short as you want.  This is something you could also do as a family together, outside or in the house.

Have a Box Sculpture Contest!

This is easy.  Just ask your parents to get empty boxes from a grocery or chain store. Make sure you have a lot of them in a lot of different sizes. Then you need strong tape, glue and markers to decorate what you make. You could even decide on a theme, like box spaceships, box forts or box cars.  You can also get creative and spruce up your sculptures with items egg cartons, ribbons and show boxes.

Make Colorful Wall Montage

When was the last time you colored with crayons?  I doubt your parents won’t let you color on your wall, but there are tons of free coloring pages online you can print and color.  Choose from all sorts of drawings and cover one of your bedroom walls with your own colorful creations. It will be like a wall mural but made up of individual pictures.  There are hundred’s of options online of things to color.

Learn How to Fly a Kite!

Kites are relatively cheap to buy, but many kids prefer to learn about kites online and make their own. This activity requires you to follow the weather and look for good places to catch the wind, usually a park or a hill. This takes those reflexes that help you play video games and uses them in the real world. And it’s fun.

Explore Your Local World!

Get a guide book or go online to find out what you can do in your home town! What is the oldest building in your city? Where was the first school built? Was anyone famous born in your town? Is there a museum you can tour? What about a pond where you can sail a boat? Or simply go to your local park and lay in the grass with a friend looking for images in the clouds.

Put on a Kids Clothing Swap!

Ask your parents what they think about this. It would be a good way to clean out closets as well as encourage everyone to recycle. Just make sure that all clothes are clean and mended when they are brought to the swap.

No matter where you live, you can enjoy a whole world of adventure. All you need to do is use your imagination.

What Did You See? Checking Facts before you Judge

Imagine you are in the back seat, playing with your phone as your dad drives you to soccer practice. You pass Liam, a kid from school. His arms are waving and his face is red as he yells at a small boy you don’t know. And your dad has driven past the scene, his attention on the road.

You shake your head, then go online and post: “What’s up with Liam? Just saw him screaming at some little kid. He’s such a loser.” “We’re here,” your dad says. “Give me your phone.”

You do and head to the locker room.

After practice, as you’re changing, you tell your teammates about Liam. “You should have seen him. And the kid was half his size.” One of the kids you tell whips out his phone and posts: “Liam. Always thought you were a jerk. Now I know.”

Only when you’re buckled in the back seat does your dad hand you your phone. Turning it on, you see that lots of your friends have commented on how much of a jerk Liam is. You feel a burst of pride. After all, you were the one who told the world about Liam’s horrible behavior.

You start responding as your dad detours to the school to get your big sister from her basketball practice.

When your sister gets in the car, she’s excited. “Did you hear about the Jameson boy? He took off from his mom and was over by the freeway throwing rocks at cars.”

Your dad shoots her a strange look. “How do you know this?”

“Well, Liam was riding by on his bike and the kid threw a rock at him. So he pulled into the ditch and told him to stop. He tried to get the kid’s home number and the boy wouldn’t tell him. Our coach had to stop drills when Liam called her to get the Mom’s number.”

You feel the slow burn of embarrassment start creeping up your neck.

“Mrs. Jameson was frantic,” your sister continues. “She’d even called the police because she couldn’t find him. The cops showed up anyway because they’d had reports about a kid throwing rocks at cars—sirens and everything. It was a wild scene.”

“Wow. Scary. A little boy that close to the freeway. And throwing rocks, no less. Good thing Liam has a head on his shoulders. That Jameson boy could have hurt someone or got hurt himself.”

And there you are, looking at all the mean postings about Liam.

You take a breath and write your next post: “Hey, everybody. Turns out that the real jerk around here is me. I’ve just learned the hard way not to make fast judgments about people. Things aren’t always what they seem to be.”

Imagine you are in the back seat, playing with your phone as your dad drives you to soccer practice. You pass Liam, a kid from school. His arms are waving and his face is red as he yells at a small boy you don’t know. And your dad has driven past the scene, his attention on the road.

You shake your head, then go online and post: “What’s up with Liam? Just saw him screaming at some little kid. He’s such a loser.” “We’re here,” your dad says. “Give me your phone.”

You do and head to the locker room.

After practice, as you’re changing, you tell your teammates about Liam. “You should have seen him. And the kid was half his size.” One of the kids you tell whips out his phone and posts: “Liam. Always thought you were a jerk. Now I know.”

Only when you’re buckled in the back seat does your dad hand you your phone. Turning it on, you see that lots of your friends have commented on how much of a jerk Liam is. You feel a burst of pride. After all, you were the one who told the world about Liam’s horrible behavior.

You start responding as your dad detours to the school to get your big sister from her basketball practice.

When your sister gets in the car, she’s excited. “Did you hear about the Jameson boy? He took off from his mom and was over by the freeway throwing rocks at cars.”

Your dad shoots her a strange look. “How do you know this?”

“Well, Liam was riding by on his bike and the kid threw a rock at him. So he pulled into the ditch and told him to stop. He tried to get the kid’s home number and the boy wouldn’t tell him. Our coach had to stop drills when Liam called her to get the Mom’s number.”

You feel the slow burn of embarrassment start creeping up your neck.

“Mrs. Jameson was frantic,” your sister continues. “She’d even called the police because she couldn’t find him. The cops showed up anyway because they’d had reports about a kid throwing rocks at cars—sirens and everything. It was a wild scene.”

“Wow. Scary. A little boy that close to the freeway. And throwing rocks, no less. Good thing Liam has a head on his shoulders. That Jameson boy could have hurt someone or got hurt himself.”

And there you are, looking at all the mean postings about Liam.

You take a breath and write your next post: “Hey, everybody. Turns out that the real jerk around here is me. I’ve just learned the hard way not to make fast judgments about people. Things aren’t always what they seem to be.”

Do You See Images in the Clouds?

images in the clouds is pareidolia

Flat on the grass, face to the sky, you’ve probably gazed up and picked out shapes in the clouds: dogs, trees, ice cream cones and almost anything else. Or you’ve looked up at the moon and seen a face.

The ability to do this isn’t a sign that you’re seeing things; it tells you that your brain is performing a job that is not only normal, it may have helped keep early human beings alive.

The ability for the brain to see familiar shapes in random things is called pareidolia. No, the clouds aren’t really shaped like lions or two birds kissing. That’s simply your brain trying to make sense of shapes that have no sense.

People who study pareidolia have different ideas on why this is an important skill for our brains to perform.

One theory goes back to when humans lived in the wild. With all the dangers that can lurk in forests and jungles, the ability to spot danger—or safety—can be the difference between life and death. A human who can more quickly spot a predator can get a heads start on running away.

Another theory is found in the eyes of babies. With all the new shapes in the world, babies are instinctively drawn to faces. They will stare at a face for longer and more intently than any other thing in their new lives.

Some researchers say that babies can recognize familiar faces just weeks after being born.

Pareidolia is part of this learning process, because the brain, experts think, looks for faces. It looks for faces in stains on a wall, in clouds, in leaves –in almost anything.

In many famous instances, people have seen the faces of familiar people in food, like the almost infamous example of the image of Mother Theresa found on a cinnamon roll. Abraham Lincoln and George Washington have both been spotted in chicken nuggets. Kate Middleton’s face was seen on a jelly bean. These are all examples of pareidolia, seeing something –or someone—familiar in a totally unrelated object.

Counsellors sometimes use pareidolia to get insight into the minds of clients. This is done using a Rorschach Test.

This test uses totally random ink blotches. Psychologist believe that when clients look at the blotches, the thoughts on their mind will be revealed in what the client says they see in the blotches. If that theory is correct, then perhaps clouds are nature’s Rorschach test.

Next time you are staring at wall paper or embers in a fire or clouds in the sky and suddenly see a face, remember: There is nothing wrong with you. Your brain is doing one of the many extraordinary tasks it is wired to do: use pareidolia to help make sense of the world.

Flat on the grass, face to the sky, you’ve probably gazed up and picked out shapes in the clouds: dogs, trees, ice cream cones and almost anything else. Or you’ve looked up at the moon and seen a face.

The ability to do this isn’t a sign that you’re seeing things; it tells you that your brain is performing a job that is not only normal, it may have helped keep early human beings alive.

The ability for the brain to see familiar shapes in random things is called pareidolia. No, the clouds aren’t really shaped like lions or two birds kissing. That’s simply your brain trying to make sense of shapes that have no sense.

People who study pareidolia have different ideas on why this is an important skill for our brains to perform.

One theory goes back to when humans lived in the wild. With all the dangers that can lurk in forests and jungles, the ability to spot danger—or safety—can be the difference between life and death. A human who can more quickly spot a predator can get a heads start on running away.

Another theory is found in the eyes of babies. With all the new shapes in the world, babies are instinctively drawn to faces. They will stare at a face for longer and more intently than any other thing in their new lives.

Some researchers say that babies can recognize familiar faces just weeks after being born.

Pareidolia is part of this learning process, because the brain, experts think, looks for faces. It looks for faces in stains on a wall, in clouds, in leaves –in almost anything.

In many famous instances, people have seen the faces of familiar people in food, like the almost infamous example of the image of Mother Theresa found on a cinnamon roll. Abraham Lincoln and George Washington have both been spotted in chicken nuggets. Kate Middleton’s face was seen on a jelly bean. These are all examples of pareidolia, seeing something –or someone—familiar in a totally unrelated object.

Counsellors sometimes use pareidolia to get insight into the minds of clients. This is done using a Rorschach Test.

This test uses totally random ink blotches. Psychologist believe that when clients look at the blotches, the thoughts on their mind will be revealed in what the client says they see in the blotches. If that theory is correct, then perhaps clouds are nature’s Rorschach test.

Next time you are staring at wall paper or embers in a fire or clouds in the sky and suddenly see a face, remember: There is nothing wrong with you. Your brain is doing one of the many extraordinary tasks it is wired to do: use pareidolia to help make sense of the world.

Free Printable Coloring Pages for Kids

Free Coloring Pages for Kids

Children today are not as fascinated by things we older generations once enjoyed so much. Back when we were kids, we loved drawing with color pencils and crayons. Coloring books were common and we would also scribble or color anywhere we could express our imagination. But all is not lost!

Today, free coloring pages for kids make it easy for anyone of any age to find printable drawings of anything imaginable. It’s true children today are not as fascinated by things older generations once enjoyed so much. It’s unfortunate that many kids now don’t find coloring books enjoyable.

There are some good reasons for this—and yes, I am talking about the internet, smartphones, and tablets. These fantastic inventions have robbed today’s kids of some of the simple pleasures in life. They are often more interested in playing video games on a computer or smartphone, instead of drawing or coloring something using markers or crayons.

However, just because kids like their smartphones and tablets doesn’t mean they wouldn’t love to draw or color. They simply need to be introduced to how fun it can be. For example, if you likes coloring animals, there are hundreds of animal coloring pages to choose from. It may be on a long car trip or at home when parents want to limit screen time. Instead of just saying “no more time on the computer”, why not provide them a fun activity as an alternative?

Online Coloring Pages

Thanks to the internet, children today have a whole new world to explore that will evoke their passion for coloring and drawing. This is something kids a generation ago were not able to experience. Professional artists are now drawing and coloring cartoons, animals, game characters, animations, and much more using highly-sophisticated computer software.

These artists also are sharing their creations on websites for everyone to enjoy. The tools and formats used by them are only available for adults with full-fledged careers. But, there are ‘kids versions’ for these tools, and children can use them to draw and color objects.

When searching for tech-free fun things to do for kids to reduce screen time, there are plenty of websites for kids to draw online with and easy-to-follow instructions to animate their drawings. Simply Google “online coloring pages” and you’ll find websites that are designed for kids to color digitally on the screen. Still, these interactive coloring pages where kids can create using the site’s tools are not the same as finding an image and printing it to color with real crayons.

Coloring Page Communities

Whether the artwork is online for virtual coloring using software or you access printable drawings, many of these coloring pages are created by the artistic community. It’s a way for them to share their art and provide fun for kids without having to publish a coloring book. The great thing about this is that parents and teachers only need to print the specific drawings that kids want to color. It’s a great way for them to explore their artist skills and decide if they some day want to join the artistic community as they grow older.

Simply introducing all the coloring page ideas of what to color could inspire someone to try coloring. Discover drawings such as Athletes, Birds, Cars, Color by number, Dinosaurs, Disney, Educational, Flags of countries and LEGO. Or try Motorcycles, My Little Pony, Princesses, Spider-Man, Star Wars, Superman, Vegetables and Winnie the Pooh. The sky is the limit for what kids can color.

Coloring as also been known to be very therapeutic for adults to help with anxiety or stress. Or just to have fun doing something they haven’t experienced since childhood. There are printable drawings available that have been created just for adults or teens. These coloring pages require a finer attention to detail. What a great reactivity to do together as a family.

Inspiring Artistic Creativity

While old-school coloring books may be a thing of the past for most children of our generation, they are one of the best ways to inspire kids and reignite their inner passion for drawing and coloring.

Introducing kids to free coloring pages can have a profound effect on children to encourage them in highlighting their creative side. It may inspire them create their own drawings to color.

It will allow them the freedom to make mistakes and improve their motor skills, thanks to the ability to reprint images and color them a second time. And it’s super easy pin their creations on a fridge without having to rip each page out of a coloring book.

Author Bio

Paul B. Wright has over five years of experience in the field of drawing. He specializes in drawing coloring pages that are printable for kids. It’s is Paul’s desire that children of all ages will will discover and grow in their true creative talents.

Share this article on free printable coloring pages with your friends and family!

Children today are not as fascinated by things we older generations once enjoyed so much. Back when we were kids, we loved drawing with color pencils and crayons. Coloring books were common and we would also scribble or color anywhere we could express our imagination. But all is not lost!

Today, free coloring pages for kids make it easy for anyone of any age to find printable drawings of anything imaginable. It’s true children today are not as fascinated by things older generations once enjoyed so much. It’s unfortunate that many kids now don’t find coloring books enjoyable.

There are some good reasons for this—and yes, I am talking about the internet, smartphones, and tablets. These fantastic inventions have robbed today’s kids of some of the simple pleasures in life. They are often more interested in playing video games on a computer or smartphone, instead of drawing or coloring something using markers or crayons.

However, just because kids like their smartphones and tablets doesn’t mean they wouldn’t love to draw or color. They simply need to be introduced to how fun it can be. For example, if you likes coloring animals, there are hundreds of animal coloring pages to choose from. It may be on a long car trip or at home when parents want to limit screen time. Instead of just saying “no more time on the computer”, why not provide them a fun activity as an alternative?

Online Coloring Pages

Thanks to the internet, children today have a whole new world to explore that will evoke their passion for coloring and drawing. This is something kids a generation ago were not able to experience. Professional artists are now drawing and coloring cartoons, animals, game characters, animations, and much more using highly-sophisticated computer software.

These artists also are sharing their creations on websites for everyone to enjoy. The tools and formats used by them are only available for adults with full-fledged careers. But, there are ‘kids versions’ for these tools, and children can use them to draw and color objects.

When searching for tech-free fun things to do for kids to reduce screen time, there are plenty of websites for kids to draw online with and easy-to-follow instructions to animate their drawings. Simply Google “online coloring pages” and you’ll find websites that are designed for kids to color digitally on the screen. Still, these interactive coloring pages where kids can create using the site’s tools are not the same as finding an image and printing it to color with real crayons.

Coloring Page Communities

Whether the artwork is online for virtual coloring using software or you access printable drawings, many of these coloring pages are created by the artistic community. It’s a way for them to share their art and provide fun for kids without having to publish a coloring book. The great thing about this is that parents and teachers only need to print the specific drawings that kids want to color. It’s a great way for them to explore their artist skills and decide if they some day want to join the artistic community as they grow older.

Simply introducing all the coloring page ideas of what to color could inspire someone to try coloring. Discover drawings such as Athletes, Birds, Cars, Color by number, Dinosaurs, Disney, Educational, Flags of countries and LEGO. Or try Motorcycles, My Little Pony, Princesses, Spider-Man, Star Wars, Superman, Vegetables and Winnie the Pooh. The sky is the limit for what kids can color.

Coloring as also been known to be very therapeutic for adults to help with anxiety or stress. Or just to have fun doing something they haven’t experienced since childhood. There are printable drawings available that have been created just for adults or teens. These coloring pages require a finer attention to detail. What a great reactivity to do together as a family.

Inspiring Artistic Creativity

While old-school coloring books may be a thing of the past for most children of our generation, they are one of the best ways to inspire kids and reignite their inner passion for drawing and coloring.

Introducing kids to free coloring pages can have a profound effect on children to encourage them in highlighting their creative side. It may inspire them create their own drawings to color.

It will allow them the freedom to make mistakes and improve their motor skills, thanks to the ability to reprint images and color them a second time. And it’s super easy pin their creations on a fridge without having to rip each page out of a coloring book.

Author Bio

Paul B. Wright has over five years of experience in the field of drawing. He specializes in drawing coloring pages that are printable for kids. It’s is Paul’s desire that children of all ages will will discover and grow in their true creative talents.

Share this article on free printable coloring pages with your friends and family!

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