Category: Preschool

Here’s How To Prepare Before Your Baby Arrives | Parenting Tips and Tricks

How To Prepare Before Your Baby Arrives

Are you a first-time parent? If so, you may be wondering what you need to do before your baby arrives. There is a lot to prepare for, and it can be overwhelming. Don’t worry – we are here to help! In this blog post, we will discuss the most important things you need to do before your baby arrives.

Here are some tips and tricks to help make the process easier for you!

Make Sure You Get The Right Crib Size

When it comes to cribs, size does matter. You want to make sure you get a crib that is the perfect size for your baby. Otherwise, they may not be able to sleep comfortably or safely in it. To do this, you will need to know the dimensions of your baby’s nursery. Once you have these, you can start shopping for cribs! If you are unsure about what size crib to get, you can always ask your pediatrician for advice. They will be able to tell you the ideal size for your baby’s nursery.

Baby Proof Everything

You need to babyproof everything before your little one arrives. This means getting rid of anything that could be a choking hazard, covering up any electrical outlets, and putting away any harmful chemicals. You also want to make sure that your childproofed doors and windows are installed properly. And finally, it’s a good idea to get some stair gates to keep your little one from getting into places they shouldn’t be.

By following these tips, you can help create a safe environment for your child before they even arrive. And once they’re here, you can rest assured knowing that you’ve done everything you can to prepare for their arrival. So go ahead and get started on babyproofing your home today!

Make Sure You Are As Healthy As You Can Be

Although having a baby is wonderful, it also presents many new emotional and physical challenges. To help you (and your baby!) navigate these changes, it’s important to make sure you are as healthy as you can be before your little one arrives.

Start by talking to your doctor about any concerns you have and getting up-to-date on all of your vaccinations. This is also a good time to start taking a prenatal vitamin if you haven’t already. Eating a healthy diet and getting regular exercise will help you feel your best during pregnancy (and beyond!).

If you have any chronic health conditions, such as diabetes or high blood pressure, be sure to work closely with your doctor to manage them during pregnancy. Additionally, if you smoke, now is the time to give it up! Smoking during pregnancy can cause serious health problems for both you and your baby.

Taking care of yourself before your baby arrives will help ensure a healthy and happy pregnancy for both of you. So don’t forget to take care of yourself, too!

Make Sure You Have Pumps Ready

If you are breastfeeding, make sure you have pumps ready. You will need to pump every few hours to keep your milk supply up. It is also a good idea to have some stored in the freezer for when you go back to work or school.

Another thing to think about is childcare. If you plan on going back to work or school, you will need to find someone to watch your baby. This can be a family member, friend, or daycare. Make sure you do your research and visit the facility before making a decision. You should also have a backup plan in case your first choice doesn’t work out.

Make Room In The Fridge

Making room in the fridge may seem like a small thing, but it’s actually really important. When you have a baby, you’re going to need a lot more food than you think. You’ll need formula, breast milk, and food for your little one. Having enough space in the fridge will help you keep everything organized and easy to find.

Another thing to keep in mind is that you’ll need to sterilize all of your baby’s bottles and nipples. This can be done by boiling them for five minutes or using a special bottle Sterilizer. You’ll also need to have a good stock of diapers on hand, as well as wipes and other changing supplies. It’s always better to be prepared than to have to run out to the store in the middle of the night!

In conclusion, there are a few things you should do to prepare for your baby’s arrival. Baby proof everything, make sure you are healthy, have pumps ready, and make room in the fridge. By following these tips, you can help make sure that both you and your baby are ready for the big day!

Preparing for your Babies Arrival

Additional Reads

How to Identify Speech-Language Milestones and Facilitate Growth at Home

Identifying Speech Language Milestones in Children

As parents and guardians, we have a crucial obligation to secure the wellness of our kids. Part of that tough job includes knowing exactly how to keep track of and encourage physical, cognitive, linguistic, and social growth, specifically in the early years of life.

We will talk about general speech and language anticipated from birth to 36 months and give suggestions to assist moms and dads in supporting their children’s advancement. As these are generalized, remember that each child develops at their own rate. If problems persist for the past couple of months, look for specialist support. There are different ways pediatric speech therapists assist parents in developing ways to support child development.

Birth to 6 months:

During this young age, your infant ought to react to sight as well as sounds. Babies will undoubtedly babble, squeal, laugh, and utilize various cries for various needs. Throughout this early stage, talk during the day, describing what you see, what you are doing, and where you are going. Respond to your baby’s articulations and facial expressions, as these are their attempts to interact! Begin reading aloud daily, using vibrant, repetitive/rhythmic passages and a vibrant voice. Babies react well to parentese, which is talking in a sing-songy voice.

7 to 12 months:

By age 1, children generally respond to their name and recognize things by label, point or grab wanted items, comprehend simple instructions, and make use of motions. Speech may include a lot more complex babbling, 2-5 early words, and a replica of noises. To encourage language development at this age caretakers must respond to squealing, model great speech, incorporate nursery rhymes or easy songs right into regimens, educate the names of familiar people and day-to-day things, take the child to new locations, and also play straightforward games such as “peek-a-boo” as well as “pat-a-cake.”

1 to 2 years:

Between 12-18 months, many children reply to ‘no’, understand basic commands and concerns, point to a few body parts, make animal sounds, use 10-30 words meaningfully, and begin to integrate words.

By 24 months old, kids can generally adhere to two-step commands, use at the very least 50 words, start to ask what, who, and where questions, and also make use of two-word sentences. Speech sounds anticipated by this age include p, b, m, h, w, and vowels.

To promote language development at this age, caregivers should attempt to:

  • encourage, reward, as well as praise efforts to speak
  • narrate acquainted routines
  • talk simply, plainly, and slowly
  • discuss new circumstances before you leave, while there, and once again when back in your residence
  • model ideal eye contact
  • describe what your kid does, really feels, and also listens to
  • play kids music

This is a terrific age to develop a day-to-day reading routine. Your child can participate by picking publications, turning pages, pointing to photos, and naming things they see. Parents, guardians, and caregivers can engage children by making remarks, asking easy concerns, and checking out the exact same book in various methods.

2 to 3 years:

As young children grow, they develop speech and language skills promptly. They seek verbal communication with others as well as establish more complex play plans, engaging in pretending to have fun with themselves and others. Your 2-year-old should develop three-word utterances, know how to hold a book upright, as well as show an exploration of writing versus drawing.

Children do best when playing with familiar adults and also various other peers. It is vital to make time to play and participate in shared activities with your youngster daily. If your child is not able to communicate with unfamiliar people or not yet utilizing basic sentences by age 3, it may be time to seek aid from an experienced expert.

Paula Acuña, M.A., CCC-SLP, is a licensed bilingual (English-Spanish) speech-language pathologist. Her practice, Ms. Paula, SLP Bilingual Speech + Language Services, offers bilingual evaluations, speech therapy, consultation, and training to meet diverse client needs. Paula and her team are dedicated to providing effective, individualized intervention to support children, adults, and their families via in-home, on-site, and telehealth services.

Read more about why speech issues negatively affects quality of life and how text to speech readers can help.

How to Prepare Your Kids for Kindergarten With Technology

Preparing Kids for Kindergarten With Technology

Kindergarten is a big step for kids and parents alike. It’s likely the first time your child will be away from you in a school setting for most of the day. It’s also the beginning of their intellectual journey.

Most states require kids to enter kindergarten by age 5 or 6, with a few exceptions. Though it might be your child’s first school experience, there are ways you can prepare them for it at an earlier age by using technology.

It’s understandable not to want to have a phone, tablet, or laptop in front of your young child’s face 24/7. But, technology isn’t all bad or damaging. When used the right way, it can make the transition to kindergarten easier for your little one. It might even make it easier on you when you know they’re more prepared and ready to tackle whatever is thrown at them throughout the year.

So, how can you use technology to empower your child as a new student and make sure they are mentally, socially, and emotionally ready for this big step?

Make Sure They’re Socially Ready

By the time your child is ready for kindergarten, they should already have certain social skills. Social and emotional development is extremely important for them to be successful in school – academically and for developing friendships. Some of the most crucial social skills for children that age include:

  • Understanding right and wrong
  • Using words to express needs and feelings
  • Sharing
  • Playing alone or with others without constant supervision
  • Making safe, independent decisions

If you’re worried that your child isn’t meeting these milestones and that they may not be ready, consider using technology to connect with a social worker.

Social workers can counsel children who might need assistance in their education and development. They can also work with you, as a parent, to offer technological tools for your child’s social development.

While your child might be too young for things like social media and texting, you can use appropriate online games to help them with their social skills. Or, download some emotional intelligence apps for them, like Daniel Tiger’s Grr-iffic Feelings or Sesame Street’s Breathe, Think, Do. If you want your child to connect with other kids their age, connect with the parents of the children who will be in their class, and set up video chats so the kids can meet and talk beforehand. It’s a great way to nurture friendships and improve communication skills before school starts.

Meeting Their Physical Needs

Most schools across the country require your child’s vaccination records. Some of the common illnesses kids need to be protected against before heading to school include:

  • Rubella
  • Mumps
  • Measles
  • Hepatitis A

Eventually, younger children might even be required or encouraged to get the COVID-19 vaccine. Over the last year and a half, you may not have been able to see your child’s pediatrician in person. Thankfully, telehealth has provided an opportunity to connect with doctors via video chat, over the phone, or through custom online portals.

Connecting with your child’s pediatrician online will let you know if they’re up-to-date on their immunizations, and whether they should come in for a check-up before starting kindergarten. It’s a great way to keep everyone safe and socially distanced while ensuring that your child has what they need to protect themselves as they start school.

Getting Them Kindergarten-Ready

There’s so much to think about and prepare for when it comes to kindergarten readiness. Some of the basic skills your child should have include:

  • Counting
  • Showing an interest in reading
  • Going to the bathroom by themselves
  • Recognizing their name in print
  • Being able to hop on one foot

If your child hasn’t mastered all of the necessary skills for kindergarten, don’t panic. Instead, consider using online activities to teach them new skills and give them confidence in the things they already know. There are plenty of kid-friendly games and resources that can spark their interest in areas that they might otherwise struggle with. You can even get some new ideas online for activities you can do with your child to boost their skills and better prepare them for school.

Of course, that doesn’t mean every second should be spent online. Making sure your child stays active and spends time with books, interacts with other kids, and uses their imagination is just as important. But, those are things that are more likely to come naturally. Technology can help them (and you) with the things that might take a bit more effort.

Even before your little one sets foot inside a school, technology can be used to prepare them in a variety of ways. From keeping them safe to boosting their cognitive abilities, consider using some of these technological advances to prepare your child for kindergarten. It’s one of the best ways to ensure they get the most out of their first school experience.

How to Teach My Child Alphabet Recognition

How to Teach My Child Alphabet Recognition

Alphabet, or letter recognition, is a foundational skill that is essential for learning to read and write. Children with a solid grasp of letter recognition can identify both upper and lowercase letters, in different contexts, in any order.  Letter recognition goes beyond singing the “ABCs,” which only teaches children to recite the alphabet from memory.

To be proficient with letter recognition, children also need to be able to distinguish the physical characteristics of each letter.  Letter recognition can begin at a very young age, with reading babies and toddlers alphabet books.

There are tremendous benefits to reading aloud to children, and books about the alphabet are no exception. Alphabet books provide children with exposure to letter names and their appearance. There are board books, storybooks, and books written in rhyme to choose from.

After your new baby arrives at home, education on letters and words is the last thing on your mind, even though their learning journey as already begun.  As children get older, they may begin recognizing some letters of personal significance, beginning with the letters in their name.

It is not uncommon for children to recognize the first letter in their name and later, to begin identifying others. This is a great starting point for teaching letter recognition. Take advantage of teachable moments to point out letters in the environment. For example, show your child how the letter on the sign is the same as the letter in her name.

Young children can benefit from tactile ways to interact with letters. One way to provide these opportunities is through the use of alphabet puzzles. In addition to the letters, alphabet puzzles often use pictures to represent the sound each letter makes. This is a great way for children to start associating letters with a picture, which can act as a cue to its sound.

Another tactile way for children to use letters is through the use of playdough. They can create the letters, either on their own, or with the help of a playdough mat that shows the outline of each letter.

Alphabet printables provide many different ways for children to work with letters. Choose from activities like mazes, spinners, tracing sheets, letter hunts, and flip books. These activities help children learn the letter names, distinguish their physical characteristics, and begin learning the sound each letter makes.

It can be helpful to have the alphabet displayed for children to refer to. This can be a premade alphabet chart or cards that you purchase from a store. Typically, they show the correct formation of each letter along with a picture that represents the letter sound. Alternatively, you can involve children in the creation of alphabet cards and have them choose pictures or items that represent each letter sound.

Having them choose the pictures can make the activity more meaningful and help them remember the sounds more easily. For example, children may choose to associate the letter “f” with a frog. The hope is that when they see the letter “f” in another context, they will think of the frog and be cued to the correct sound an”f” makes.

When focusing on letter recognition, it is important for children to learn both the upper- and lowercase letters of the alphabet. In addition to the activities outlined above, matching provides another way for children to see the physical differences between upper- and lowercase letters. Provide them with opportunities to use materials like magnetic letters, letter tiles, stamps, or stickers to match the upper- and lowercase letters. It can be overwhelming to work with the entire alphabet, so begin with a few known letters and add in one or two new ones.

There are lots of ways to teach children the letters of the alphabet. Choose different activities to keep them engaged and provide lots of encouragement as they begin the exciting journey of becoming a reader!

Do Babies Always Respond to Their Name?

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