About Safe Search

Safe Search Kids is powered by Google for filtered search results.

Safe Image Search

Safe Search Kids delivers safe filtered images, powered by Google.

Safe Wiki Search

Safe Search Kids delivers safe wiki articles for kids and teens.

Safe Video Search

Search for safe filtered videos from a variety of trusted sources.

What is Simple Wikipedia?

Simple Wikipedia

Simple Wikipedia is a separate version of the primarily used Wikipedia. It is written in basic English and is ideal for younger kids or tweens who read at lower grade level. You can find any topic on Simple Wikipedia that is available on the main English version.

The simple version of Wikipedia is also an online encyclopedia, but sentences are shorter, and grammar is easier to understand.

This more simple Wikipedia can also be beneficial for people from cultures that are just learning English or those who have a limited understanding of the language. Readers with learning disabilities will also find it helpful.

Because Safe Search Kids promotes safe search resources, we provide yet another version of Wikipedia that is not directly affiliated. It has been created by our partner KidzSearch and can be searched at the top of our website.

Getting back to the topic of Simple Wikipedia, this alternative version will also be beneficial for anyone researching difficult to understand topics. Concepts of higher education or technical subjects can be easier to grasp when written in a simple way.

When learning about any topic, remember that Wikipedia should only be used as a starting point. Wikipedia’s popularity has grown because of how easy it is to find so much information on a single website, all with without ads or external links within the articles. But you cannot always trust what you read as absolute fact. Your library remains to be your best tool for good research.

A suggested research method for older students is to first read the regular version of Wikipedia. Work to understand what is being communicated. The history, the characters in the unfolding story, or the detailed explanation of a complicated theory.

Make a few notes and write a brief summary of what you’ve learned. Then, search for the same article in the Simple Wikipedia version. You may find further insight thanks to the use of less complex words and sentences.

When doing any research on Wikipedia, whether the simple version or not, it is essential to understand that Wikipedia is an “open source” online Encyclopedia. This means anyone can change it, so make sure you explore all aspects of the article. This includes all cited references and external links to reputable sources. Many articles will make a note if a fact is not fully verified.

As mentioned, Simple Wikipedia should not be your sole resource on any topic. Don’t forget to visit your school library to confirm facts and details. These findings from published books should be your sources when writing an article or paper. Even Wikipedia states that it is not a reliable source. If you are a student, check with your teacher’s views regarding the use of a Wikipedia as a research tool.

Being that Wikipedia and Simple Wikipedia are “open source” and able to be updated by anyone, if you find information in an article this is incorrect you are welcome to correct the article and cite your reliable sources. The most popular Wiki articles have a moderator that will review your entry. This is how Wikipedia grows to be more reliable.

What We Have Learned about Wikipedia’s

  • Wikipedia is a free online Encyclopedia written in English, as well as many other languages.
  • Simple Wikipedia is an additional English version of Wikipedia, written at a lower reading level.
  • Wiki for Kids is our own form of Wikipedia created for younger kids. It employs safe search and is kept separate from the main unfiltered Internet. Scroll Up to search Wikipedia for Kids at the top of our website.

Simple Wikipedia is a separate version of the primarily used Wikipedia. It is written in basic English and is ideal for younger kids or tweens who read at lower grade level. You can find any topic on Simple Wikipedia that is available on the main English version.

The simple version of Wikipedia is also an online encyclopedia, but sentences are shorter, and grammar is easier to understand.

This more simple Wikipedia can also be beneficial for people from cultures that are just learning English or those who have a limited understanding of the language. Readers with learning disabilities will also find it helpful.

Because Safe Search Kids promotes safe search resources, we provide yet another version of Wikipedia that is not directly affiliated. It has been created by our partner KidzSearch and can be searched at the top of our website.

Getting back to the topic of Simple Wikipedia, this alternative version will also be beneficial for anyone researching difficult to understand topics. Concepts of higher education or technical subjects can be easier to grasp when written in a simple way.

When learning about any topic, remember that Wikipedia should only be used as a starting point. Wikipedia’s popularity has grown because of how easy it is to find so much information on a single website, all with without ads or external links within the articles. But you cannot always trust what you read as absolute fact. Your library remains to be your best tool for good research.

A suggested research method for older students is to first read the regular version of Wikipedia. Work to understand what is being communicated. The history, the characters in the unfolding story, or the detailed explanation of a complicated theory.

Make a few notes and write a brief summary of what you’ve learned. Then, search for the same article in the Simple Wikipedia version. You may find further insight thanks to the use of less complex words and sentences.

When doing any research on Wikipedia, whether the simple version or not, it is essential to understand that Wikipedia is an “open source” online Encyclopedia. This means anyone can change it, so make sure you explore all aspects of the article. This includes all cited references and external links to reputable sources. Many articles will make a note if a fact is not fully verified.

As mentioned, Simple Wikipedia should not be your sole resource on any topic. Don’t forget to visit your school library to confirm facts and details. These findings from published books should be your sources when writing an article or paper. Even Wikipedia states that it is not a reliable source. If you are a student, check with your teacher’s views regarding the use of a Wikipedia as a research tool.

Being that Wikipedia and Simple Wikipedia are “open source” and able to be updated by anyone, if you find information in an article this is incorrect you are welcome to correct the article and cite your reliable sources. The most popular Wiki articles have a moderator that will review your entry. This is how Wikipedia grows to be more reliable.

What We Have Learned about Wikipedia’s

  • Wikipedia is a free online Encyclopedia written in English, as well as many other languages.
  • Simple Wikipedia is an additional English version of Wikipedia, written at a lower reading level.
  • Wiki for Kids is our own form of Wikipedia created for younger kids. It employs safe search and is kept separate from the main unfiltered Internet. Scroll Up to search Wikipedia for Kids at the top of our website.

Gen Z Students Are Reshaping College & The Job Economy

College Education for All Races - Gen Z

It’s an interesting time to be a student in America. The action behind asking our children, “What do you want to be when you grow up?” may have more influence than we know. Turns out, Gen Z – those born from 1995 to 2012 – is obsessed with learning. In fact, it’s common for Gen Z students to spend their extra free time on homework and volunteering.

Today, the typical Gen Z student dedicates 6.48 hours per work to homework and 2.66 hours per work to volunteering. Due to a plethora of similar habits, Gen Z is on course to become the most educated and most entrepreneurial generation.

Yet, nearly 9 in 10 Gen Z college grads considered job availability before selecting a major. With unemployment at its lowest since 1969 – three generations before Gen Z’s time – why is our youngest generation alive so curious about their future employability?

To put it lightly, they’re ahead of the game.

Rising student debt has made Gen Z wary, and most want to know they’ll be getting their money’s worth before enrolling into college. Schools are getting involved, as well, encouraging students to take Advanced Planet (AP), dual credit, and the International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma Program courses and exams. Today, nearly half of Gen Z high school students have already earned college credits.

Don’t fret- students are curious, not worried. 2 in 3 Gen Z students are confident they’ll receive a job offer soon after graduation. For some majors, it’s even higher. Even more, 60% of our youngest generation on the planet impressively plans to start a business one day, and 92% expect to work for less than six employees in their lifetime – Gen Z doesn’t even bother with summer gigs.

Most teens prioritize studying to earn future scholarships over working a job. This is the main way Gen Z is reshaping how we “do” college as a society. Nearly half of American workers are living on less than $18,000 a year, and Gen Z is privy to this, so 82% think college is the way to get there. In the meantime to graduating high school, most are most focused on earning grants and aid.

Interestingly enough, one in three 15-year-olds plan to pursue one of the top 10 most popular occupations, regardless of whether or not their desired career will still be in-demand by the time they’ll be eligible for hire. Gen Z is ahead of its time – it’s all about employment for them. As we witness our very own children reshape the college years, continue to ask them, “What do you want to be when you grow up?”

How Gen Z is Reshaping the College Years

It’s an interesting time to be a student in America. The action behind asking our children, “What do you want to be when you grow up?” may have more influence than we know. Turns out, Gen Z – those born from 1995 to 2012 – is obsessed with learning. In fact, it’s common for Gen Z students to spend their extra free time on homework and volunteering.

Today, the typical Gen Z student dedicates 6.48 hours per work to homework and 2.66 hours per work to volunteering. Due to a plethora of similar habits, Gen Z is on course to become the most educated and most entrepreneurial generation.

Yet, nearly 9 in 10 Gen Z college grads considered job availability before selecting a major. With unemployment at its lowest since 1969 – three generations before Gen Z’s time – why is our youngest generation alive so curious about their future employability?

To put it lightly, they’re ahead of the game.

Rising student debt has made Gen Z wary, and most want to know they’ll be getting their money’s worth before enrolling into college. Schools are getting involved, as well, encouraging students to take Advanced Planet (AP), dual credit, and the International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma Program courses and exams. Today, nearly half of Gen Z high school students have already earned college credits.

Don’t fret- students are curious, not worried. 2 in 3 Gen Z students are confident they’ll receive a job offer soon after graduation. For some majors, it’s even higher. Even more, 60% of our youngest generation on the planet impressively plans to start a business one day, and 92% expect to work for less than six employees in their lifetime – Gen Z doesn’t even bother with summer gigs.

Most teens prioritize studying to earn future scholarships over working a job. This is the main way Gen Z is reshaping how we “do” college as a society. Nearly half of American workers are living on less than $18,000 a year, and Gen Z is privy to this, so 82% think college is the way to get there. In the meantime to graduating high school, most are most focused on earning grants and aid.

Interestingly enough, one in three 15-year-olds plan to pursue one of the top 10 most popular occupations, regardless of whether or not their desired career will still be in-demand by the time they’ll be eligible for hire. Gen Z is ahead of its time – it’s all about employment for them. As we witness our very own children reshape the college years, continue to ask them, “What do you want to be when you grow up?”

How Gen Z is Reshaping the College Years

How to Develop Good Password Management Habits

Teaching kids about passwords

Selecting an easy to remember password seems like a simple enough thing to do. But when it comes to protecting your online accounts, there are a few important things to consider before you lock in that special password that is all your own and unique to you.

Is your password secure enough? Are you using the same password across multiple accounts? What if someone hacks into a database and learns your password and email address?

Whether it be on social media, cloud backup or a password to your bank account, keeping track of passwords is a hassle. Still, passwords remain to be out first defense against an invasion of privacy that can affect our safety both on and offline. Until fingerprint technology or facial recognition becomes the norm, we all need to learn and develop good password management habits.

Learning Password Management at School

Password management can be an excellent point of discussion that is catered to students of any age that are already choosing their own passwords for their various social media accounts. Here are a few guidelines and tips that can also be used for parents at home, who in many cases are already helping their kids choose passwords for transparency at home and for online protection.

1. The importance of forming a strong password comes before anything else

Make sure your password contains capital letters, numbers, as well as special symbols. Also, do your best to make sure passwords are at least a certain length. These types of passwords may be difficult to remember immediately, so write them down and keep it on a piece of paper at home. Many online accounts save the password on your computer or smart phone app and it may be a while before you have to enter it in again.

If you fail to memorize your password and you didn’t write it down, you can create a new by clicking “forget password”, which will send a password resent link to your email.

2. The dangers of entering one’s password on a public computer

The problem with public computers is that you never know what might be lurking in the shadows. Unless you happen to be the administrator, which you probably aren’t. There might be all sorts of malware hidden in there, including the one that can spy on keystrokes.

Even assuming the computer is clean, there’s always a danger. After all, humans are on the forgetful side of the scale. In other words, your can easily forget to log out of your account and grant full control to the next random person who comes by. Not an ideal situation. Plus, you never know who’s standing behind your back when you enter your password in public.

When using your own phone or computer in a public place, be wary of logging into an account when connected to a public Wi-Fi that does not require users to identity themselves.

3. The problem of trading security for convenience and the reasons why it’s discouraged

Too many people fall into the convenience trap. They start reusing the same password across different websites for the sake of keeping things easy to remember. An additional way to increase security is to learn more about the importance of using a password manager. Thanks to its functionality, users keep the convenience of not having to remember too much. They enable creating different passwords for each account while only having to memorize the master password to access the rest.

Learning Password Management at Home

Often, kids can be more tech-savvy than their parents. But even as a parent you can take the initiative to protect your family with security basics, and beyond, that are often overlooked by those who feel they are already up-to-date on the latest in online safety.

Let’s also not forget that technology is always evolving. Hackers are continually coming up with new ways to gain unlawful access to private databases and accounts. What was good practice for protecting privacy two years ago may not be the best way to go about it today.

1. Remote data wiping technology

Even if you do everything right cybersecurity-wise, what’s stopping you from misplacing or losing your device? Many people tend to be forgetful. So, if you’re not sure where your phone is (especially if you suspect someone has snatched it right out of your pocket), deleting your data before it gets into the wrong hands is a wise course of action. Remote data wiping technology is an insurance policy in this regard.

If you have important information you want to save, you’ll want to set up some sort of online back-up to a cloud account. This way you can easily restore your device if you wipe it clean. Of course, make sure your online back-up account also has a strong password.

2. Two-factor authentication

Malware programs can steal your passwords right from under your nose. With two-factor authentication you can greatly increase protection of your accounts. Two-factor authentication asks anyone logging in to perform an extra step (like entering a PIN from a confirmation SMS) before granting access an account. It can restrict access in case of a data breach or stolen password.

3. Password variations that use the same core are a terrible idea

Never underestimate the creative mind of a hacker. If they can get close to guessing your second password based on another, it won’t take long before they succeed. Randomly generated passwords are a much better idea than different variations of the same password.

4. Personally identifiable information is a no-no

Let’s put it this way. The street where you live, as well as your birthday, are all facts that can be available to anyone. Anyone willing to go to great lengths to get them, that is. Therefore, you should avoid constructing passwords around publicly identifiable information.

5. The importance of changing your passwords often

Changing your passwords regularly is a good cybersecurity practice. But it also tends to be forgotten, especially when many accounts do not require changing your password regularly. Again, with a password manager, having to remember a whole new batch of passwords becomes a non-issue.


No matter your age or expertise, the creation of a good strong password is often taken for granted. Whether it’s a social media account, a website for online shopping, your online banking access – or an app on your phone, each one of your accounts is an online profile of you that’s worth protecting in as many ways that are available.

Selecting an easy to remember password seems like a simple enough thing to do. But when it comes to protecting your online accounts, there are a few important things to consider before you lock in that special password that is all your own and unique to you.

Is your password secure enough? Are you using the same password across multiple accounts? What if someone hacks into a database and learns your password and email address?

Whether it be on social media, cloud backup or a password to your bank account, keeping track of passwords is a hassle. Still, passwords remain to be out first defense against an invasion of privacy that can affect our safety both on and offline. Until fingerprint technology or facial recognition becomes the norm, we all need to learn and develop good password management habits.

Learning Password Management at School

Password management can be an excellent point of discussion that is catered to students of any age that are already choosing their own passwords for their various social media accounts. Here are a few guidelines and tips that can also be used for parents at home, who in many cases are already helping their kids choose passwords for transparency at home and for online protection.

1. The importance of forming a strong password comes before anything else

Make sure your password contains capital letters, numbers, as well as special symbols. Also, do your best to make sure passwords are at least a certain length. These types of passwords may be difficult to remember immediately, so write them down and keep it on a piece of paper at home. Many online accounts save the password on your computer or smart phone app and it may be a while before you have to enter it in again.

If you fail to memorize your password and you didn’t write it down, you can create a new by clicking “forget password”, which will send a password resent link to your email.

2. The dangers of entering one’s password on a public computer

The problem with public computers is that you never know what might be lurking in the shadows. Unless you happen to be the administrator, which you probably aren’t. There might be all sorts of malware hidden in there, including the one that can spy on keystrokes.

Even assuming the computer is clean, there’s always a danger. After all, humans are on the forgetful side of the scale. In other words, your can easily forget to log out of your account and grant full control to the next random person who comes by. Not an ideal situation. Plus, you never know who’s standing behind your back when you enter your password in public.

When using your own phone or computer in a public place, be wary of logging into an account when connected to a public Wi-Fi that does not require users to identity themselves.

3. The problem of trading security for convenience and the reasons why it’s discouraged

Too many people fall into the convenience trap. They start reusing the same password across different websites for the sake of keeping things easy to remember. An additional way to increase security is to learn more about the importance of using a password manager. Thanks to its functionality, users keep the convenience of not having to remember too much. They enable creating different passwords for each account while only having to memorize the master password to access the rest.

Learning Password Management at Home

Often, kids can be more tech-savvy than their parents. But even as a parent you can take the initiative to protect your family with security basics, and beyond, that are often overlooked by those who feel they are already up-to-date on the latest in online safety.

Let’s also not forget that technology is always evolving. Hackers are continually coming up with new ways to gain unlawful access to private databases and accounts. What was good practice for protecting privacy two years ago may not be the best way to go about it today.

1. Remote data wiping technology

Even if you do everything right cybersecurity-wise, what’s stopping you from misplacing or losing your device? Many people tend to be forgetful. So, if you’re not sure where your phone is (especially if you suspect someone has snatched it right out of your pocket), deleting your data before it gets into the wrong hands is a wise course of action. Remote data wiping technology is an insurance policy in this regard.

If you have important information you want to save, you’ll want to set up some sort of online back-up to a cloud account. This way you can easily restore your device if you wipe it clean. Of course, make sure your online back-up account also has a strong password.

2. Two-factor authentication

Malware programs can steal your passwords right from under your nose. With two-factor authentication you can greatly increase protection of your accounts. Two-factor authentication asks anyone logging in to perform an extra step (like entering a PIN from a confirmation SMS) before granting access an account. It can restrict access in case of a data breach or stolen password.

3. Password variations that use the same core are a terrible idea

Never underestimate the creative mind of a hacker. If they can get close to guessing your second password based on another, it won’t take long before they succeed. Randomly generated passwords are a much better idea than different variations of the same password.

4. Personally identifiable information is a no-no

Let’s put it this way. The street where you live, as well as your birthday, are all facts that can be available to anyone. Anyone willing to go to great lengths to get them, that is. Therefore, you should avoid constructing passwords around publicly identifiable information.

5. The importance of changing your passwords often

Changing your passwords regularly is a good cybersecurity practice. But it also tends to be forgotten, especially when many accounts do not require changing your password regularly. Again, with a password manager, having to remember a whole new batch of passwords becomes a non-issue.


No matter your age or expertise, the creation of a good strong password is often taken for granted. Whether it’s a social media account, a website for online shopping, your online banking access – or an app on your phone, each one of your accounts is an online profile of you that’s worth protecting in as many ways that are available.

Using Video & AI To Improve The Student Experience

Think back to the popularity of Smart Board use in the classroom. Technology provides a way to show students a wider range of opportunities. Today, 86% of educators – including teachers, principals, and more – believe students need to enhance their tech knowledge, and learn video capturing skills to succeed in order to succeed in their future workplace.

Why so? Using video maximizes classroom time. Education institutions have reported some interesting numbers, documenting that 91% of students experience satisfaction when learning by video. Not only is the student more satisfied, but their achievements improve by 82%, as well. Think about the reapable benefits of a flipped classroom.

With flipped focus, students learn new content outside of class, through video and tech. A flipped classroom proves beneficial because the focus is 80% student-centered, and students discuss and explore applications in-class.

On the other hand, traditional teaching only centers 35% of instruction on the student. Teachers review homework and present new content in class, while students are left to do homework and practice what they’ve learned after school hours have concluded.

The benefits of a flipped classroom are endless. Primarily, a flipped classroom increases student engagement, allows learning to be more collaborative, and guides students to self-discovery.

Of course, there are challenges in any instance. Pointing this out, a flipped classroom can easily become active, noisy, and distracting for those who struggle to work in the aforementioned conditions.

Furthermore, flipped instruction must be strategically executed for reapable benefits to be available as students may have trouble focusing in a flipped learning environment.

In order to improve the educational experience on behalf of the student, more artificial intelligence will be implemented into the classroom. For example, educators are using chatbots to provide self-paced learning for the student, track performance, provide immediate feedback, score assignments and tests, and communicate with parents.

The future of education is becoming as technologized as every other industry. From 2014 to 2019, educators increased their use of video for capturing campus events, flipped instruction, providing assignment feedback, and many more tasks. Even so, 98% of educators believe video will play an important role in the personalization of education, and 89% are interested in VR/AR/360 video.

Today, 9 in 10 educators are interested in the benefits of tech to improve the learning experience for students. To learn more about how education will look for future generations, check out the accompanying graphic.

Re-Imagining Schools

Think back to the popularity of Smart Board use in the classroom. Technology provides a way to show students a wider range of opportunities. Today, 86% of educators – including teachers, principals, and more – believe students need to enhance their tech knowledge, and learn video capturing skills to succeed in order to succeed in their future workplace.

Why so? Using video maximizes classroom time. Education institutions have reported some interesting numbers, documenting that 91% of students experience satisfaction when learning by video. Not only is the student more satisfied, but their achievements improve by 82%, as well. Think about the reapable benefits of a flipped classroom.

With flipped focus, students learn new content outside of class, through video and tech. A flipped classroom proves beneficial because the focus is 80% student-centered, and students discuss and explore applications in-class.

On the other hand, traditional teaching only centers 35% of instruction on the student. Teachers review homework and present new content in class, while students are left to do homework and practice what they’ve learned after school hours have concluded.

The benefits of a flipped classroom are endless. Primarily, a flipped classroom increases student engagement, allows learning to be more collaborative, and guides students to self-discovery.

Of course, there are challenges in any instance. Pointing this out, a flipped classroom can easily become active, noisy, and distracting for those who struggle to work in the aforementioned conditions.

Furthermore, flipped instruction must be strategically executed for reapable benefits to be available as students may have trouble focusing in a flipped learning environment.

In order to improve the educational experience on behalf of the student, more artificial intelligence will be implemented into the classroom. For example, educators are using chatbots to provide self-paced learning for the student, track performance, provide immediate feedback, score assignments and tests, and communicate with parents.

The future of education is becoming as technologized as every other industry. From 2014 to 2019, educators increased their use of video for capturing campus events, flipped instruction, providing assignment feedback, and many more tasks. Even so, 98% of educators believe video will play an important role in the personalization of education, and 89% are interested in VR/AR/360 video.

Today, 9 in 10 educators are interested in the benefits of tech to improve the learning experience for students. To learn more about how education will look for future generations, check out the accompanying graphic.

Re-Imagining Schools


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