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Tech Trends That Will Make the Internet a Safe Place for Kids

Tech Trends for Safe Kids Internet

Children nowadays access the Internet daily for school or pastime starting from a very young age. And since they might be too young to understand potential threats and consequences of their actions, parents, educators, and online service providers are obligated to step in and make the Internet a safe place for kids.

If you’re a parent, you already know that keeping children safe in the ‘Internet of Things’ era is an uphill task. However, technological advancement doesn’t only mean more risks or dangers for children online. Here are some technological trends that are making the Internet a safer place for children.

Internet of Things

The Internet of Things or IoT, in short, enables a seamless connection between multiple devices. In a broader sense, everyday devices contain sensors and stream data to and from the Internet.

Ironically, many IoT devices like baby monitors and smart toys have gone from a way to protect children to devices that could put them at significant risk.

Regulatory bodies are continuously making efforts to impose safety standards on manufacturers of such devices and toys. These regulations call for stronger protocols and encryption and more options available in parental controls so that parents can filter out questionable content and the amount or nature of data being collected.

Using apps that sync across devices, parents can access and control many of these devices from a distance. This is greatly beneficial for monitoring which data is being exchanged, through which channels, and ensuring that sensitive data doesn’t fall into the wrong hands (or ears). It makes it easy for parents and educators to keep an eye on children’s activities both online and offline.

User and Entity Behavior Analytics

Online parenting forums are awash with hacking incidents where passwords and usernames fall into the wrong hands. Once a hacker gains access to your account or device, they can waltz in and do as they please.

Unfortunately, not all breaches are detected fast enough to prevent damage or data leaks. This is especially problematic if personal data of children are involved.

In the future, such incidents should create less worry for parents, though.

One of the latest advancements in cybersecurity is User Behavior Analytics (UBA). The technology uses data analytics to identify anomalous user behavior and alerts administrators about suspicious activities.

UBA uses machine learning technologies to “learn” about a user’s normal and regular activity pattern. It can then differentiate between a legitimate user’s activity and an attacker who has gained entry by compromising log-in credentials if these activities don’t fit the norm of the legitimate user.

While UBA is still only in the realm of large organizations, its ability to quickly detect and respond to unusual activities in places that children frequently visit makes it a viable solution for minimizing future data breaches and leaks.

Multifactor Authentication

Many applications, websites, and devices use Multifactor Authentication or MFA in short, to improve account security. Technically, MFA refers to any system where a user must use at least two authentication forms to access a device, an application, or a website.

If your children use devices or applications, you’ll find MFA handy. Immediately after you log into a device with your username and password, the account server will prompt you to provide a second and independent authentication form.

It’s more or less what happens when bank security asks to see your social security card even though your funds are already secure.

MFA’s concept is that it’s difficult to pretend you’re someone you’re not when you have to prove who you are in different ways repeatedly.

If you’re monitoring how often your child uses a device, MFA will make it hard for your child to use the device even after getting their hands on the device without your approval. Most importantly, it will help keep out those that shouldn’t have access to it in the first place.

AI and ML

AI, along with IoT and other emerging technologies like ML, are continuing to change how we use the Internet. Nearly all modern devices that enter the market are IoT enabled. This includes not only smartphones but also TVs and gaming consoles, as well as almost all Virtual Reality gaming setups.

Together, these technologies are shaping a safer Internet environment for children. Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning come complete with advanced language processing abilities. That means that unsafe content can easily be filtered out.

As an example, such technology enables fast image processing that analyses the content of the image and then interferes before a child can see it.

Recently, Instagram updated its filters to remove comments intended to upset or harass its users automatically. The new filter hides negative comments about a person’s character, appearance, and any other content that poses a threat to a user’s physical health and well-being.

Wrap Up

The Internet is an exciting place, but is it really safe? Can you, as a parent, allow your children to use it unsupervised? The answer is probably a resounding no.

Online safety is a continuous battle that never ends. Malicious attacks, inappropriate content, and data theft methods continue to evolve along with the technologies intended to prevent them.

So what can a busy parent do? The answer lies in taking advantage of tech trends designed to prevent malicious content from showing up in searches.

Using safe environments such as Safe Search for Kids, YouTube Kids, and implementing all available mechanisms to filter out inappropriate content on devices is a start. Tech progress and trends like some of these mentioned here will contribute to making the Internet a safer place for kids.

About the author:

Ashley Wilson is a digital nomad and writer for hire, specialized in business and tech topics. In her self-care time, she practices yoga via Youtube. She has been known to reference movies in casual conversation and enjoys trying out new food. You can get in touch with Ashley via Twitter.

Children nowadays access the Internet daily for school or pastime starting from a very young age. And since they might be too young to understand potential threats and consequences of their actions, parents, educators, and online service providers are obligated to step in and make the Internet a safe place for kids.

If you’re a parent, you already know that keeping children safe in the ‘Internet of Things’ era is an uphill task. However, technological advancement doesn’t only mean more risks or dangers for children online. Here are some technological trends that are making the Internet a safer place for children.

Internet of Things

The Internet of Things or IoT, in short, enables a seamless connection between multiple devices. In a broader sense, everyday devices contain sensors and stream data to and from the Internet.

Ironically, many IoT devices like baby monitors and smart toys have gone from a way to protect children to devices that could put them at significant risk.

Regulatory bodies are continuously making efforts to impose safety standards on manufacturers of such devices and toys. These regulations call for stronger protocols and encryption and more options available in parental controls so that parents can filter out questionable content and the amount or nature of data being collected.

Using apps that sync across devices, parents can access and control many of these devices from a distance. This is greatly beneficial for monitoring which data is being exchanged, through which channels, and ensuring that sensitive data doesn’t fall into the wrong hands (or ears). It makes it easy for parents and educators to keep an eye on children’s activities both online and offline.

User and Entity Behavior Analytics

Online parenting forums are awash with hacking incidents where passwords and usernames fall into the wrong hands. Once a hacker gains access to your account or device, they can waltz in and do as they please.

Unfortunately, not all breaches are detected fast enough to prevent damage or data leaks. This is especially problematic if personal data of children are involved.

In the future, such incidents should create less worry for parents, though.

One of the latest advancements in cybersecurity is User Behavior Analytics (UBA). The technology uses data analytics to identify anomalous user behavior and alerts administrators about suspicious activities.

UBA uses machine learning technologies to “learn” about a user’s normal and regular activity pattern. It can then differentiate between a legitimate user’s activity and an attacker who has gained entry by compromising log-in credentials if these activities don’t fit the norm of the legitimate user.

While UBA is still only in the realm of large organizations, its ability to quickly detect and respond to unusual activities in places that children frequently visit makes it a viable solution for minimizing future data breaches and leaks.

Multifactor Authentication

Many applications, websites, and devices use Multifactor Authentication or MFA in short, to improve account security. Technically, MFA refers to any system where a user must use at least two authentication forms to access a device, an application, or a website.

If your children use devices or applications, you’ll find MFA handy. Immediately after you log into a device with your username and password, the account server will prompt you to provide a second and independent authentication form.

It’s more or less what happens when bank security asks to see your social security card even though your funds are already secure.

MFA’s concept is that it’s difficult to pretend you’re someone you’re not when you have to prove who you are in different ways repeatedly.

If you’re monitoring how often your child uses a device, MFA will make it hard for your child to use the device even after getting their hands on the device without your approval. Most importantly, it will help keep out those that shouldn’t have access to it in the first place.

AI and ML

AI, along with IoT and other emerging technologies like ML, are continuing to change how we use the Internet. Nearly all modern devices that enter the market are IoT enabled. This includes not only smartphones but also TVs and gaming consoles, as well as almost all Virtual Reality gaming setups.

Together, these technologies are shaping a safer Internet environment for children. Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning come complete with advanced language processing abilities. That means that unsafe content can easily be filtered out.

As an example, such technology enables fast image processing that analyses the content of the image and then interferes before a child can see it.

Recently, Instagram updated its filters to remove comments intended to upset or harass its users automatically. The new filter hides negative comments about a person’s character, appearance, and any other content that poses a threat to a user’s physical health and well-being.

Wrap Up

The Internet is an exciting place, but is it really safe? Can you, as a parent, allow your children to use it unsupervised? The answer is probably a resounding no.

Online safety is a continuous battle that never ends. Malicious attacks, inappropriate content, and data theft methods continue to evolve along with the technologies intended to prevent them.

So what can a busy parent do? The answer lies in taking advantage of tech trends designed to prevent malicious content from showing up in searches.

Using safe environments such as Safe Search for Kids, YouTube Kids, and implementing all available mechanisms to filter out inappropriate content on devices is a start. Tech progress and trends like some of these mentioned here will contribute to making the Internet a safer place for kids.

About the author:

Ashley Wilson is a digital nomad and writer for hire, specialized in business and tech topics. In her self-care time, she practices yoga via Youtube. She has been known to reference movies in casual conversation and enjoys trying out new food. You can get in touch with Ashley via Twitter.

A Parent’s Guide to Setting Up Smart TV Safely

how to set up your smart tv safely

Smart TVs function just as regular TVs but with internet connectivity, like smartphones. They have built-in apps as well as capabilities to surf the web, send emails, access social media platforms, and stream videos on Amazon Prime Video, YouTube, and other similar streaming services. 

In the second quarter of 2020, Netflix had 72.9 million U.S. subscribers, so there’s no denying how popular smart Tvs are. However, with the advent of this technology, designed to access the internet using interfaces like Apple TV or the Fetchbox, there is a glut of content alongside child usage risks that parents need to consider.

With that in mind, here’s the Safe Search Kids guide to setting up a smart TV, plus some advice on how to ensure your kids search safely.

Parental controls on Smart TVs

Before purchasing a Smart TV, it is good to be aware of the parental controls available. Also, make sure you can create different user profiles, including setting up a child’s account.

To understand each parental control on a brand of Smart TV, go to the specific manufacturer’s website. You can also utilize this free database to learn about how to set up these controls.

If you have a regular TV but are considering buying an Android TV box to give you the ability to stream content and access online apps, you will also need to set up parental controls.

To do this, select the “Settings” icon (the little cog in the upper-right corner of your screen). Next, click “Parental Control” which is below the “Input” option. This will take you to the Parental Control settings. You can find more information on this here.

Potential privacy risks of a Smart TV

Unfortunately, most digital inventions are not without some degree of risk. Like a computer or a smartphone, Smart TVs have access to inbuilt cameras, audio recordings, personal data, and social media data. It is essential to read the privacy policy when a manufacturer releases a software update.

A voice-recognition Smart TV can keep data of what you are saying, searching for, and watching. This information is used to provide you with adverts suited to your preferences.

To set up privacy settings accurately, do not go for a quick set-up, but search for custom settings that allow you to turn on or off each privacy feature. It is advisable not to download any suspicious software on your Smart TV as there is no anti-virus developed for Smart TVs yet.

Apps

As with smartphones, apps are installable on Smart TVs. Some apps require a subscription fee like Netflix and Amazon Prime to access and enjoy the features. Others may require additional tweaking of settings to function properly.

Remember that these apps don’t come with in-built parental control settings, and your kids can view inappropriate content. Hence, the need to canvas through the TV manual or guide to further set these controls. Another feature accessible on smart TVs are social media apps. We have a guide you can read on how to protect your kids on social media.

Even if they are merely gaming apps that claim to be child-friendly, you still need to know the gaming apps’ PEGI rating.

Managing streaming content

If you have allowed streaming services such as Netflix, YouTube, and Hulu to run on your Smart TV, you have to set separate parental controls for each of the apps.

For the various streaming services, you can find out how to set parental controls here: Netflix, YouTube, and Hulu.

Internet filtering and connectivity

Almost all Smart TVs offer built-in Wi-Fi to access your home network and the internet. Although ethernet provides a faster and stable internet connection, smart TVs come in-built Wi-Fi that leaves no cable trails lying around.

Internet filtering is a must when protecting kids on the internet. With a simple Google search, you can easily find a trusted internet filter software that allows you complete control over your kids’ access to the internet. Many other apps are designed to keep your kids safe online and give you peace of mind.

 Browsing

Once you have set up parental filters on the broadband-connection to your smart TV, you don’t need to worry as your children surf the net. Just as with other devices connected to your router, won’t smart TVs allow the display of inappropriate websites or content after this one-time set-up.

Parental filters allow kids to watch child-safe content from YouTube or Netflix, via the web or app. It is essential to set browsing limits for all devices in your home, which has internet connectivity.

 Content

The only thing to keep in mind is to be thorough in the content you allow your kids to access. There are many children-designed channels provided on Smart TVs.

Look at the channels offered for children on the streaming services you have subscribed to and ensure you are satisfied with the kind of program your kids would be viewing. Some streaming services allow you to create multiple user accounts with age limits features.

Screen time management

Before setting up a way for kids to manage their screen time, ensure that all the inappropriate sites and content are filtered out of your home network broadband.

If you have not already done that, limiting your child’s screen time won’t change much. You can now use helpful screen time management software designed for parents to monitor and control their child’s access to the internet and screen time.

Final thoughts

As more content gets uploaded on the internet daily, there are growing concerns from parents who want to protect their kids from inappropriate content. The number one thing to do however is to set up parental controls on all the smart devices at your home.

Parents can now monitor their kids’ access when surfing the internet, even via smart TVs. With digital services, it’s best to continually update the apps and devices’ settings, especially if your child has access to them.

Finally, remember to chat to your child and instill a good screen-time to off-screen time balance. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends no more than two hours of screen time for children and teenagers per day, and absolutely no screen time for children under 2. Too much screen time can not only disturb children’s sleep patterns, but increase the risk of emotional, social, and attention problems, and even obesity.

Safe searching!

Smart TVs function just as regular TVs but with internet connectivity, like smartphones. They have built-in apps as well as capabilities to surf the web, send emails, access social media platforms, and stream videos on Amazon Prime Video, YouTube, and other similar streaming services. 

In the second quarter of 2020, Netflix had 72.9 million U.S. subscribers, so there’s no denying how popular smart Tvs are. However, with the advent of this technology, designed to access the internet using interfaces like Apple TV or the Fetchbox, there is a glut of content alongside child usage risks that parents need to consider.

With that in mind, here’s the Safe Search Kids guide to setting up a smart TV, plus some advice on how to ensure your kids search safely.

Parental controls on Smart TVs

Before purchasing a Smart TV, it is good to be aware of the parental controls available. Also, make sure you can create different user profiles, including setting up a child’s account.

To understand each parental control on a brand of Smart TV, go to the specific manufacturer’s website. You can also utilize this free database to learn about how to set up these controls.

If you have a regular TV but are considering buying an Android TV box to give you the ability to stream content and access online apps, you will also need to set up parental controls.

To do this, select the “Settings” icon (the little cog in the upper-right corner of your screen). Next, click “Parental Control” which is below the “Input” option. This will take you to the Parental Control settings. You can find more information on this here.

Potential privacy risks of a Smart TV

Unfortunately, most digital inventions are not without some degree of risk. Like a computer or a smartphone, Smart TVs have access to inbuilt cameras, audio recordings, personal data, and social media data. It is essential to read the privacy policy when a manufacturer releases a software update.

A voice-recognition Smart TV can keep data of what you are saying, searching for, and watching. This information is used to provide you with adverts suited to your preferences.

To set up privacy settings accurately, do not go for a quick set-up, but search for custom settings that allow you to turn on or off each privacy feature. It is advisable not to download any suspicious software on your Smart TV as there is no anti-virus developed for Smart TVs yet.

Apps

As with smartphones, apps are installable on Smart TVs. Some apps require a subscription fee like Netflix and Amazon Prime to access and enjoy the features. Others may require additional tweaking of settings to function properly.

Remember that these apps don’t come with in-built parental control settings, and your kids can view inappropriate content. Hence, the need to canvas through the TV manual or guide to further set these controls. Another feature accessible on smart TVs are social media apps. We have a guide you can read on how to protect your kids on social media.

Even if they are merely gaming apps that claim to be child-friendly, you still need to know the gaming apps’ PEGI rating.

Managing streaming content

If you have allowed streaming services such as Netflix, YouTube, and Hulu to run on your Smart TV, you have to set separate parental controls for each of the apps.

For the various streaming services, you can find out how to set parental controls here: Netflix, YouTube, and Hulu.

Internet filtering and connectivity

Almost all Smart TVs offer built-in Wi-Fi to access your home network and the internet. Although ethernet provides a faster and stable internet connection, smart TVs come in-built Wi-Fi that leaves no cable trails lying around.

Internet filtering is a must when protecting kids on the internet. With a simple Google search, you can easily find a trusted internet filter software that allows you complete control over your kids’ access to the internet. Many other apps are designed to keep your kids safe online and give you peace of mind.

 Browsing

Once you have set up parental filters on the broadband-connection to your smart TV, you don’t need to worry as your children surf the net. Just as with other devices connected to your router, won’t smart TVs allow the display of inappropriate websites or content after this one-time set-up.

Parental filters allow kids to watch child-safe content from YouTube or Netflix, via the web or app. It is essential to set browsing limits for all devices in your home, which has internet connectivity.

 Content

The only thing to keep in mind is to be thorough in the content you allow your kids to access. There are many children-designed channels provided on Smart TVs.

Look at the channels offered for children on the streaming services you have subscribed to and ensure you are satisfied with the kind of program your kids would be viewing. Some streaming services allow you to create multiple user accounts with age limits features.

Screen time management

Before setting up a way for kids to manage their screen time, ensure that all the inappropriate sites and content are filtered out of your home network broadband.

If you have not already done that, limiting your child’s screen time won’t change much. You can now use helpful screen time management software designed for parents to monitor and control their child’s access to the internet and screen time.

Final thoughts

As more content gets uploaded on the internet daily, there are growing concerns from parents who want to protect their kids from inappropriate content. The number one thing to do however is to set up parental controls on all the smart devices at your home.

Parents can now monitor their kids’ access when surfing the internet, even via smart TVs. With digital services, it’s best to continually update the apps and devices’ settings, especially if your child has access to them.

Finally, remember to chat to your child and instill a good screen-time to off-screen time balance. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends no more than two hours of screen time for children and teenagers per day, and absolutely no screen time for children under 2. Too much screen time can not only disturb children’s sleep patterns, but increase the risk of emotional, social, and attention problems, and even obesity.

Safe searching!

5 ‘New School Year’ Resolutions

New School Year Resolutions

Everyone makes promises to themselves at New Year. They “resolve” to be nicer, eat better, work harder and not spend so much time on social media. New School Year Resolutions make more sense. January 1 is just a day, but when you start a new school year, you begin a new journey that will impact the rest of your life.

Your school days this year are totally different than last school year. You will learn new things. You will meet new people. And you are a new person. As you go back to school you are older and know more than you did when you started school last year. To see how much of a difference a school year can make, look at the pictures on your phone or your social media pages. How are you different? Has your music changed? The movies you like? What about your friends? Have they changed?

Ask yourself these questions. Then think about the new school year. You will be different when it is over. Make a resolution that lets you decide how different you could be! Think about these resolutions:

1. Resolve to Spend More Time In Real Life.

Too many kids—and adults—spend big parts of their days online. The Internet is fun and can bring people together but having fun and hanging out with people in real time is better. You can see them, touch them, share real life. Also, people tend to be nicer when they look into each other’s eyes.

2. Resolve to Work Towards My Goals.

You want to be an astronaut? Then pay extra attention in science class. Want to be a pop star? Be sure to practice your guitar or piano. Are you going to be a police officer? Maybe ask a teacher to bring an officer to school so that you can ask questions.

3. Resolve to Never Post On Social Media When You Get Mad.

As we learned in a previous article, posting on social when mad can be just as bad as when other people do wrong things that made you mad, or even hurt you, in the first place. If you need help learning how to control your anger, it will save you from getting into a lot of trouble.

4. Resolve to Be More Grown-Up.

All kids want to be respected and treated like a grown-up. Think about how to earn that respect and treatment. Maybe pick a chore and always do it, like taking out the garbage or vacuuming the living room. Always do what you say you are going to do. Be respectful and get respect back. Even if you know adults that act like children, you can be better than that.

5. Resolve to Be a Kid.

Yes, you are growing up and starting a whole new year of school, but you are still a kid. Enjoy it. Play basketball. Make a backyard fort. Hang out with your friends and make new ones. Wear silly tee-shirts. Play hide and seek in the park. You want to be grown-up and you will. When you are an adult you will not be able to do many of the fun things you do as a kid. Do them now.

A now, a word for Teachers.  Read about why some kids love school!

Everyone makes promises to themselves at New Year. They “resolve” to be nicer, eat better, work harder and not spend so much time on social media. New School Year Resolutions make more sense. January 1 is just a day, but when you start a new school year, you begin a new journey that will impact the rest of your life.

Your school days this year are totally different than last school year. You will learn new things. You will meet new people. And you are a new person. As you go back to school you are older and know more than you did when you started school last year. To see how much of a difference a school year can make, look at the pictures on your phone or your social media pages. How are you different? Has your music changed? The movies you like? What about your friends? Have they changed?

Ask yourself these questions. Then think about the new school year. You will be different when it is over. Make a resolution that lets you decide how different you could be! Think about these resolutions:

1. Resolve to Spend More Time In Real Life.

Too many kids—and adults—spend big parts of their days online. The Internet is fun and can bring people together but having fun and hanging out with people in real time is better. You can see them, touch them, share real life. Also, people tend to be nicer when they look into each other’s eyes.

2. Resolve to Work Towards My Goals.

You want to be an astronaut? Then pay extra attention in science class. Want to be a pop star? Be sure to practice your guitar or piano. Are you going to be a police officer? Maybe ask a teacher to bring an officer to school so that you can ask questions.

3. Resolve to Never Post On Social Media When You Get Mad.

As we learned in a previous article, posting on social when mad can be just as bad as when other people do wrong things that made you mad, or even hurt you, in the first place. If you need help learning how to control your anger, it will save you from getting into a lot of trouble.

4. Resolve to Be More Grown-Up.

All kids want to be respected and treated like a grown-up. Think about how to earn that respect and treatment. Maybe pick a chore and always do it, like taking out the garbage or vacuuming the living room. Always do what you say you are going to do. Be respectful and get respect back. Even if you know adults that act like children, you can be better than that.

5. Resolve to Be a Kid.

Yes, you are growing up and starting a whole new year of school, but you are still a kid. Enjoy it. Play basketball. Make a backyard fort. Hang out with your friends and make new ones. Wear silly tee-shirts. Play hide and seek in the park. You want to be grown-up and you will. When you are an adult you will not be able to do many of the fun things you do as a kid. Do them now.

A now, a word for Teachers.  Read about why some kids love school!

Breaking Down Cyberbullying and Its Prevention

Cyberbullying Prevention

Before the world went online, children worried about being bullied at school, on the playground, or in the park. However, today’s bullies have access to mobile phones, computers, gaming consoles, and other technology. This has led to the rise of cyberbullying, and this type of digital abuse can have far-reaching, devastating consequences.

Let’s take a closer look at it and how to prevent it from happening.

Tactics Of Cyberbullies

People who haven’t experienced cyberbullying might think it begins and ends with mean comments on the victim’s Facebook profile or nasty text messages. Those are a couple of tactics used by cyberbullies, but there are many more.

These are the most common ways in which bullies attack people online:

  • Posting hateful, nasty comments about someone’s body, ethnicity, gender, religion, race, socio-economic background, or other characteristics online
  • Posting embarrassing or hurtful comments about them online
  • Posting or sending them threats of violence
  • Posting comments or sending messages telling them to kill themselves
  • Posting humiliating or mean photos or videos of or directed at the victim
  • Creating a nasty fake profile, blog, or webpage about someone
  • Creating fake profiles to gain personal information about the victim and then posting or sharing that information
  • Creating fake profiles to spread false information about the victim
  • Doxing victims by posting personal information such as their full name, contact details, home address, credit card number, social security, and more

As you can see from these tactics, cyberbullies use electronic devices such as mobile phones to harass, mock, or threaten people intentionally and repeatedly. Victims will agree that the effects can be as hurtful and damaging as face-to-face bullying on the playground, office environment, or anywhere else.

Cyberbullying – The Characteristics

Cyberbullying differs from bullying that happens in person, and the tactics that cyberbullies use have certain characteristics.

These are a few of those characteristics:

Anonymity – Cyberbullying often is anonymous. Bullies hide behind fake profiles, which makes it more challenging to put a stop to them. Not knowing who is behind the abusive behavior can also make it more terrifying for victims.

Difficult to detect – It’s easier for parents to detect physical bullying. For example, mom or dad would notice if Johnny or Bailey came home from school with a black eye or a ripped shirt. It’s far more difficult to detect that a child is receiving threats online if they don’t say anything about it to their parents.

Cyberbullying is ongoing – The persistence of this type of harassment is a major factor. Rather than being limited to school hours, bullies can use their phones or other devices to attack or harass victims at any time of the day or night.

Attacks can be permanent – If others share posts made by cyberbullies, or if online content goes undeleted, their attacks can be permanent. Some social media platforms may delete abusive content if reported, but it can be impossible to track everything shared. Once something has been posted online, it’s difficult to delete it completely.

Cyberbullying can be far-reaching – Due to the nature of the internet and social media platforms, cyberbullying has a much bigger audience than bullying that happens face-to-face. Nasty posts made about someone online can reach thousands of people around the world in a few minutes.

Cyberbullying Has Serious Effects

According to UNICEF, victims of cyberbullying often feel as though there is no escape. Whether they are at home, school, or anywhere else, they know that the bully can strike at any moment. The constant threat of attack can have serious consequences.

Cyberbullying can cause stress-related physical problems such as tension headaches, stomach aches or stomach upsets, and sleep loss. It can also have an emotional impact by making the victims feel ashamed about the things they enjoy. And it can cause mental anguish by making victims feel angry, embarrassed, stupid, or upset.

Some victims of cyberbullying have been made to feel so ashamed, embarrassed, and upset that they’ve never spoken out. Of course, the bullying did not stop. It got so bad that the victims took their own lives in some situations because they could not deal with it any longer.

Parents and children need to understand that, as terrible as cyberbullying can be, it’s not the end of the road for the victim. They can regain their peace of mind and confidence again. This takes time and possibly counseling, but recovery is possible.

Cyberbullying Prevention Tips For Young People

Arguments between people happen from time to time, and they’re normal. However, if someone is repeatedly nasty to you for no fault of your own, it’s bullying. Don’t blame yourself for it, because no one deserves to be bullied.

Save the evidence of bullying. Whether the cyberbully sends text messages, posts on Facebook, or leaves nasty comments on Instagram, save the messages, download the videos, or take screenshots of the posts. Evidence may help authorities take action if you have to proceed with a bullying lawsuit to end the harassment.

Do not retaliate. Your upset or angry response may add fuel to the fire. If bullies know they’re getting to you, they’re likely to continue. If you know the bully’s identity, don’t retaliate in vengeance because that will turn you into a bully too. Instead, save the evidence and seek help.

Tell someone you trust. Even if it seems difficult or embarrassing, telling a parent, relative, friend, or teacher what’s happening can be one of the best things you can do for yourself.

Cyberbullying Prevention Tips For Parents

Follow or befriend your child on social media. This way, you can keep an eye on what they’re doing and what others are saying in response to them.

Educate your child. Tell them about not accepting friend requests from strangers, and warn against posting personal information and compromising photos online.

Be proactive. If you see cyberbullying taking place, report the posts – even if your child is not the victim.

Cyberbullying is one of the downsides of the digital age. Victims need all the support they can get, while bullies need to learn that good people will not accept their vile behavior.

Meta Title: A Look At Cyberbullying And Prevention Tips | Safe Search Kids

Meta Description: Cyberbullying is a horrible reality of the digital age. Take a closer look at its tactics and characteristics, and at tips that can help prevent it.

Before the world went online, children worried about being bullied at school, on the playground, or in the park. However, today’s bullies have access to mobile phones, computers, gaming consoles, and other technology. This has led to the rise of cyberbullying, and this type of digital abuse can have far-reaching, devastating consequences.

Let’s take a closer look at it and how to prevent it from happening.

Tactics Of Cyberbullies

People who haven’t experienced cyberbullying might think it begins and ends with mean comments on the victim’s Facebook profile or nasty text messages. Those are a couple of tactics used by cyberbullies, but there are many more.

These are the most common ways in which bullies attack people online:

  • Posting hateful, nasty comments about someone’s body, ethnicity, gender, religion, race, socio-economic background, or other characteristics online
  • Posting embarrassing or hurtful comments about them online
  • Posting or sending them threats of violence
  • Posting comments or sending messages telling them to kill themselves
  • Posting humiliating or mean photos or videos of or directed at the victim
  • Creating a nasty fake profile, blog, or webpage about someone
  • Creating fake profiles to gain personal information about the victim and then posting or sharing that information
  • Creating fake profiles to spread false information about the victim
  • Doxing victims by posting personal information such as their full name, contact details, home address, credit card number, social security, and more

As you can see from these tactics, cyberbullies use electronic devices such as mobile phones to harass, mock, or threaten people intentionally and repeatedly. Victims will agree that the effects can be as hurtful and damaging as face-to-face bullying on the playground, office environment, or anywhere else.

Cyberbullying – The Characteristics

Cyberbullying differs from bullying that happens in person, and the tactics that cyberbullies use have certain characteristics.

These are a few of those characteristics:

Anonymity – Cyberbullying often is anonymous. Bullies hide behind fake profiles, which makes it more challenging to put a stop to them. Not knowing who is behind the abusive behavior can also make it more terrifying for victims.

Difficult to detect – It’s easier for parents to detect physical bullying. For example, mom or dad would notice if Johnny or Bailey came home from school with a black eye or a ripped shirt. It’s far more difficult to detect that a child is receiving threats online if they don’t say anything about it to their parents.

Cyberbullying is ongoing – The persistence of this type of harassment is a major factor. Rather than being limited to school hours, bullies can use their phones or other devices to attack or harass victims at any time of the day or night.

Attacks can be permanent – If others share posts made by cyberbullies, or if online content goes undeleted, their attacks can be permanent. Some social media platforms may delete abusive content if reported, but it can be impossible to track everything shared. Once something has been posted online, it’s difficult to delete it completely.

Cyberbullying can be far-reaching – Due to the nature of the internet and social media platforms, cyberbullying has a much bigger audience than bullying that happens face-to-face. Nasty posts made about someone online can reach thousands of people around the world in a few minutes.

Cyberbullying Has Serious Effects

According to UNICEF, victims of cyberbullying often feel as though there is no escape. Whether they are at home, school, or anywhere else, they know that the bully can strike at any moment. The constant threat of attack can have serious consequences.

Cyberbullying can cause stress-related physical problems such as tension headaches, stomach aches or stomach upsets, and sleep loss. It can also have an emotional impact by making the victims feel ashamed about the things they enjoy. And it can cause mental anguish by making victims feel angry, embarrassed, stupid, or upset.

Some victims of cyberbullying have been made to feel so ashamed, embarrassed, and upset that they’ve never spoken out. Of course, the bullying did not stop. It got so bad that the victims took their own lives in some situations because they could not deal with it any longer.

Parents and children need to understand that, as terrible as cyberbullying can be, it’s not the end of the road for the victim. They can regain their peace of mind and confidence again. This takes time and possibly counseling, but recovery is possible.

Cyberbullying Prevention Tips For Young People

Arguments between people happen from time to time, and they’re normal. However, if someone is repeatedly nasty to you for no fault of your own, it’s bullying. Don’t blame yourself for it, because no one deserves to be bullied.

Save the evidence of bullying. Whether the cyberbully sends text messages, posts on Facebook, or leaves nasty comments on Instagram, save the messages, download the videos, or take screenshots of the posts. Evidence may help authorities take action if you have to proceed with a bullying lawsuit to end the harassment.

Do not retaliate. Your upset or angry response may add fuel to the fire. If bullies know they’re getting to you, they’re likely to continue. If you know the bully’s identity, don’t retaliate in vengeance because that will turn you into a bully too. Instead, save the evidence and seek help.

Tell someone you trust. Even if it seems difficult or embarrassing, telling a parent, relative, friend, or teacher what’s happening can be one of the best things you can do for yourself.

Cyberbullying Prevention Tips For Parents

Follow or befriend your child on social media. This way, you can keep an eye on what they’re doing and what others are saying in response to them.

Educate your child. Tell them about not accepting friend requests from strangers, and warn against posting personal information and compromising photos online.

Be proactive. If you see cyberbullying taking place, report the posts – even if your child is not the victim.

Cyberbullying is one of the downsides of the digital age. Victims need all the support they can get, while bullies need to learn that good people will not accept their vile behavior.

Meta Title: A Look At Cyberbullying And Prevention Tips | Safe Search Kids

Meta Description: Cyberbullying is a horrible reality of the digital age. Take a closer look at its tactics and characteristics, and at tips that can help prevent it.


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